research report

This review explores the learning from delivery of care in residential services for children and young people, residential services and supported housing for people with learning disabilities and hospice care, and considers how this can be applied in care homes for older people. Full report or summary available.

One of the ways in which the Commission monitors individuals’ care and treatment is through the visits programme. It visits individuals in a range of settings throughout Scotland: at home, in hospital or in any other setting such as prisons where care and treatment is being delivered. 

This report details findings from visits between May and September 2013 to 51 women who met the above criteria and makes a number of recommendations in response to these findings.

Review that explores the learning from delivery of care in residential services for children and young people, residential services and supported housing for people with learning disabilities and hospice care, and considers how this can be applied in care homes for older people.

Throughout November and December 2013, SAMH invited service users and external organisations to participate in a series of discussion groups looking at the interaction of poverty and deprivation and mental health.

This paper forms part of SAMH’s Know Where to Go campaign – a Scotland-wide campaign to tackle the barriers to accessing information, help and support for mental health.

Report that argues that the extra costs disabled people face is the first important challenge. It brings together new research and analysis to give a fuller picture of extra costs. It includes data gathered through a survey and in-depth interviews, as well as an investigation into the disability wealth penalty conducted by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE).

Report that is the fourth in a series dating back to 1999 which looks at how the publicly financed health care systems in the four countries of the UK have fared before and after devolution.

An investigation into the relationship between professional practice, child protection and disability.

In March 2013 the Scottish Government appointed researchers from the University of Edinburgh/NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre and the University of Strathclyde, School of Social Work and Social Policy, to investigate the relationship between disabled children and child protection practice. Through interviews and focus groups, the researchers spoke with 61 professionals working on issues of disabled children and child protection in Scotland.

Given the value placed on zero-hour contracts by some employers and workers, and the incomplete picture of their scale, an outright ban seems inappropriate at this time. But maintaining the status quo would overlook the poor use of these arrangements in a considerable minority of cases.

Details the case of Child D, who was just under three weeks old, and was admitted to hospital with multiple serious injuries in October 2012. Medical advice was that these injuries had been inflicted. Child D’s mother, Ms E, a woman in her early twenties, was arrested.

Report inspired by a number of projects conducted on dementia in partnership with Red and Yellow Care. The studies include over 200 hours of ethnographic observation in care homes and with individuals living at home. The views of more than 80 people with dementia, 50 carers and numerous frontline practitioners working in different clinical, careor support roles both in and beyond dementia care settings, are taken into account.