research report

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.

Report based on the second in a series of annual reviews to gauge the scale of child neglect and monitor the effects of changes in national and local policy and practice.

Booklet which introduces a summarised, communication-focussed view of various approaches to public dialogue and deliberation. It brings together ideas from various disciplines and fields of practice to explore how they can be put to work towards meaningful public engagement.

Shared values and principles that should govern approaches to integration and the way new structures are built that will empower citizens of Scotland and unlock them from the failing of past systems, rather than locking them into a new system that lacks a clear vision.

Details the case of Child D, who was just under three weeks old, and was admitted to hospital with multiple serious injuries in October 2012. Medical advice was that these injuries had been inflicted. Child D’s mother, Ms E, a woman in her early twenties, was arrested.

Report inspired by a number of projects conducted on dementia in partnership with Red and Yellow Care. The studies include over 200 hours of ethnographic observation in care homes and with individuals living at home. The views of more than 80 people with dementia, 50 carers and numerous frontline practitioners working in different clinical, careor support roles both in and beyond dementia care settings, are taken into account.

Paper that calls on the government to present a coherent, far-sighted programme to tackle the UK’s gang problem. In doing so it highlights the plight of girls and young women associated with gangs, who are often marginalised in discussion of these issues.

Report which identifies that as many as 40 per cent of children lack secure bonds, and there is particular concern for the 15 per cent who actively resist their parent. It recommends more support for good parenting and attachment by health visitors and children’s centres, with evidence-based interventions for those identified as higher risk.