research report

Providing employment and training opportunities for offenders: growing sustainable work integration social enterprises

Learning from a series of case studies to explore and assess the role of social enterprises in enabling both adult and young offenders to access training and employment opportunities.

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards: putting them into practice [SCIE report 66]

This resource describes good practice in the management and implementation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS; the Safeguards). It includes the roles of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and wider local authority governance. The resource is structured with freestanding sections on hospitals, care homes, supervisory bodies, assessors and authorisers.

Learning for care homes from alternative residential care settings

This review explores the learning from delivery of care in residential services for children and young people, residential services and supported housing for people with learning disabilities and hospice care, and considers how this can be applied in care homes for older people. Full report or summary available.

Social justice, the Common Weal and children and young people in Scotland

Paper that considers how the Common Weal can connect to children and young people’s concepts of social justice. It considers children and young people’s experiences, in light of the Christie Commission’s call for public service provision to confront inequalities.

The paper poses questions about the extent to which children and young people will be involved in, and be able to define, the Common Weal.

Mental health of women detained by the criminal courts

One of the ways in which the Commission monitors individuals’ care and treatment is through the visits programme. It visits individuals in a range of settings throughout Scotland: at home, in hospital or in any other setting such as prisons where care and treatment is being delivered. 

This report details findings from visits between May and September 2013 to 51 women who met the above criteria and makes a number of recommendations in response to these findings.

Learning for care homes from alternative residential care settings

Review that explores the learning from delivery of care in residential services for children and young people, residential services and supported housing for people with learning disabilities and hospice care, and considers how this can be applied in care homes for older people.

Worried sick: experiences of poverty and mental health across Scotland

Throughout November and December 2013, SAMH invited service users and external organisations to participate in a series of discussion groups looking at the interaction of poverty and deprivation and mental health.

This paper forms part of SAMH’s Know Where to Go campaign – a Scotland-wide campaign to tackle the barriers to accessing information, help and support for mental health.

Priced out: ending the financial penalty of disability by 2020

Report that argues that the extra costs disabled people face is the first important challenge. It brings together new research and analysis to give a fuller picture of extra costs. It includes data gathered through a survey and in-depth interviews, as well as an investigation into the disability wealth penalty conducted by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE).

The fourth health systems of the United Kingdom: how do they compare?

Report that is the fourth in a series dating back to 1999 which looks at how the publicly financed health care systems in the four countries of the UK have fared before and after devolution.

The research looks at how the four national health systems compare and how they have performed in terms of quality and productivity before and after devolution. It also examines performance in North East England, which is acknowledged to be the region that is most comparable to Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland in terms of socioeconomic and other indicators.

Disabled children and child protection in Scotland

An investigation into the relationship between professional practice, child protection and disability.

In March 2013 the Scottish Government appointed researchers from the University of Edinburgh/NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre and the University of Strathclyde, School of Social Work and Social Policy, to investigate the relationship between disabled children and child protection practice. Through interviews and focus groups, the researchers spoke with 61 professionals working on issues of disabled children and child protection in Scotland.