research report

Violent and aggressive children. Caring for those who care

The topic of domestic violence is an emotive one conjuring visions of child abuse by parents or carers, or marital violence, in general abuse by men of their wives or partners. According to published police statistics in Scotland for the years of 2012 – 13 male violence of women accounted for 80% of all domestic abuse, and in 2014 over 2,600 children in Scotland were identified as needing protection from abuse. This is particularly concerning since the NSPCC suggests that, for every child who has been identified, there are 8 other children who are at risk but who are ‘under the radar’.

The trauma of parenting traumatised children

This article explores the impact of abandonment abuse and neglect, not only on children but, centrally, on the foster carers, adopters and kinship carers who parent children where it has been deemed that a return home to birth parents is not in their interests. (For purposes of simplicity we will refer to these carers as ‘parenting figures’.) In doing this we aim to provide parenting figures with support and understanding as well as reducing the feelings of isolation that is often integral to parenting ‘looked after’ children.

Lives sentenced. Experiences of repeated punishment

Little is known about the effects of repeated imprisonment. Very few research studies have examined how those who are punished by the criminal justice system experience and interpret their sentences. Research that does exist, like my PhD, has largely focused on one single sentence. But people who have served many sentences (in other words, who have long punishment careers), are likely not to experience criminal punishments in isolation, but in the context of their wider lives and previous sentences.

Exploring family carer involvement in forensic mental health services

While there is a growing body of research about carers’ experiences generally, the needs and experience of those who support individuals in forensic (secure) mental health services (forensic carers) have been neglected

Support in Mind Scotland (SiMS) and the Forensic Network commissioned this study from the University of Central Lancashire to examine what they identified as ‘significant gaps and inconsistencies’, focusing in particular on the views and experiences of forensic carers.

Young people creating belonging

The Sight and Sound Project used creative sensory methods to explore how young people who are looked after feel that they belong, or do not belong, in the places that they live. In this project the concept of belonging, which is often used in relation to faith or ethnic groups is applied to home spaces. Research suggests that ‘sensory experience can provide a strong sense of belonging’ and that sounds, textures and what people see in the places they live are important in terms of making a person feel “at home’.

Older people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds Accessing health and social care services in south GLasgow

The Advocacy Project works with older people and other groups across Glasgow and Lanarkshire to ensure their voice is heard, their needs met and their legal rights safeguarded.

The organisation identified a low take up of their own service by older people from BME communities, which was generally held to reflect the wider picture in Glasgow in relation to health and social work services.

Old age doesn’t come alone a case study on the impact of the ageing population on a Scottish local authority’s care at home service.

This research was undertaken by Stuart Fordyce as part of an MSc in Integrated Service Improvement (Health and Social Care) at the University of Edinburgh.
It considers the impact of a rapidly ageing population on a Scottish local authority and its attempt to shift the focus to a more contemporary service provision. The aim is to explore what factors are inhibiting the effectiveness of enablement.

What is adult support and protection? Meaning-making perspectives on ASP in Scotland

Fiona Sherwood-Johnson believes that it is helpful to think of adult support and protection as something that’s constructed – that is, as something that policy and legislation have a hand in constructing, and something that gets continually re-constructed on the ground. She is blogging on Research Unbound to share her thoughts and ideas on ASP.

Exploring informed choice in the context of self-directed support for disabled young people in transition: A qualitative study

MSc Dissertation on Research Unbound. Transitions between children’s and adult social care services for disabled young people are recognised internationally as being challenging for the young person, their families and services. The dissertation explored the phenomenon of informed choice in relation to the policy of self-directed support for disabled young people in transition from child to adult social care supports.

Perspectives on knowledge into action in education and public service reform: a review of relevant literature and an outline framework for change

A literature review from What Works Scotland. It draws on research from the field of health and social care on evidence informed practice and the processes through which knowledge is translated in to action. Talks about role knowledge champions and knowledge brokers and difference between research contributions and research impact