research report

Scottish review that builds on the first review in a series of UK wide reviews of child neglect undertaken by Action for Children in partnership with the University of Stirling and addresses three questions:

- How many children are currently experiencing neglect in Scotland?
- How good are we at recognising children who are at risk of, or are experiencing neglect?
- How well are we helping children at risk of, or currently experiencing neglect?

Paper that explores the Scottish evidence for a link between social capital and health outcomes in order to inform the ongoing development of an assets-based approach to addressing health problems and inequalities.

It uses data from two sources – the 2009 Scottish Health Survey and the 2009 Scottish Social Attitudes survey, although the majority of the paper focuses on the former due to the inclusion of self-assessed health plus WEMWBS variables.

Paper that considers how the Common Weal can connect to children and young people’s concepts of social justice. It considers children and young people’s experiences, in light of the Christie Commission’s call for public service provision to confront inequalities.

The paper poses questions about the extent to which children and young people will be involved in, and be able to define, the Common Weal.

Report that considers how well implementation of the recommendations of the review has progressed in the year since the review’s publication, and how the child protection landscape as a whole is changing. The overall conclusion of the report is that progress is moving in the right direction but that it needs to move faster. There are promising signs that some reforms are encouraging new ways of thinking and working and so improving services for children.

The ‘Sight and Sound Project’ used creative sensory methods to explore how young people who are looked after feel that they belong, or do not belong, in the places that they live.

Paper that examines whether there are any changes the Scottish Government can make, in the short-term, to improve the way the government-funded nursery provision works as well as feed into the wider debate on childcare.

Research into experiences of lone parents in rural Fife conducted in partnership with Fife Gingerbread. Volunteers from the Fife Gingerbread Buddy programme with experience of lone parenthood were trained as peer researchers and were involved in all stages of the research project, the design, fieldwork and analysis.

The research sought to explore and understand lone parent’s quality of life within rural communities of Fife.

A Better Life was a major five year programme of work developed by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation which explored how to achieve a good quality of life for older people with high support needs.

This briefing has been produced by IRISS to ensure that the messages and challenges of A Better Life are understood in the context of the current policy drivers in Scotland and are translated into practice across the country.