research report

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

The topic of this briefing is the prevention of pregnancy among a specific group: looked after children and young people, who usually live in foster homes, but may also be in residential placements or with family members. Research and policy literature currently focuses on the provision of appropriate and adequate sex and relationship education in conjunction with accessible contraceptive services as the means of reducing teenage pregnancy.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This resource looks at making sure good quality independent advocacy is available to everyone in Scotland who needs it. In order to increase the provision of independent advocacy, services may have to be set up which are not initially independent. The report examines ways of making it easier for non-independent advocacy services to become independent and the importance of making sure that where advocacy is not independent, then measures are in place to make that advocacy as free as possible from conflicts of interest.

Report of a study which aimed to evaluate the implementation of the MHCT Act through an in-depth exploration of the experiences and perceptions of service users, carers and different health and social care professionals and advocacy workers, and a consideration of stakeholders' views in light of those expressed before implementation of the Act.

The Kilbrandon report was, and still remains, one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'. Though it is now over thirty years since it was first published, current debate about child care practices and polices in Scotland still resonates with principles and philosophies derived from the Kilbrandon Report itself.

This is the second annual report of the Perth and Kinross Child Protection Committee (CPC) and it sets out the wide range of work which has been undertaken by partner agencies in the past year to evaluate, strengthen and develop services to protect children and young people in Perth and Kinross. Significant achievements include wide ranging campaigns and initiatives to raise awareness about child protection and what to do if you have concerns about the safety of a child.

Report examining the magnitude and impact of violence throughout the world, identifying the key risk factors for violence, looking at the types of intervention and policy responses which have been attempted and how effective they have been and making recommendations for action at local, national and international level.

In 2008, JRF published the first ‘minimum income standard for Britain’, based on what members of the public thought people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. A year later, and in changing economic circumstances, the standard has been updated for inflation. This study updates 2008’s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.

Study looking at the types of child care available to asylum seekers and refugees across the spectrum of communal provision with a view to noting the attitudes of asylum seeker families towards pre-five provision, identifying restrictions in accessing pre-five services, establishing whether there are identifiable gaps in provision and determining if the service meets the needs of asylum seeker families.