research report

This report describes the findings and conclusions of an inter-disciplinary review of social work and health services in Scotland to support vulnerable families with young children aged 0-3 years. It also takes account of other important services such as early education and childcare, housing, health services for adults and Children’s Hearings.

Report presenting a comprehensive picture of the European situation on illicit drugs and medicines in relation to driving and summarising the studies which have been published on the subject since 1999.

Set of three separate papers looking at the development and delivery of personalised services and approaches. The first paper considers what personalisation is and what areas need to be aligned to bring about real user engagement, flexibility and improved outcomes.

The second discusses the role of commissioning in transforming services to meet future needs and the third examines commissioning in greater detail and identifies the issues which arise at an operational level and which might need to be addressed.

In July 2008 the Scottish Government commissioned Scott Moncrieff to review the data security procedures within eight research contractors who had regularly been commissioned to carry out social research on behalf of the Scottish Government.

One year ago the Scottish Government launched Scotland’s first drugs strategy since devolution. Central to the strategy was a new approach to tackling problem drug use based firmly on the concept of recovery. The action set out in the strategy reflects that tackling drug use requires action across a broad range of areas. This progress report takes the same approach.

Report setting out the findings of an evaluation of the Crannog service in Dumfries and Galloway whose object is to provide support to young people who are either often excluded from school or at risk of exclusion.

Report of an evaluation of the Camelon, Larbert and Grangemouth Support to Parents (CLASP) Project which set out to discover any potential weaknesses in the service and make recommendations for improvement.

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

The topic of this briefing is the prevention of pregnancy among a specific group: looked after children and young people, who usually live in foster homes, but may also be in residential placements or with family members. Research and policy literature currently focuses on the provision of appropriate and adequate sex and relationship education in conjunction with accessible contraceptive services as the means of reducing teenage pregnancy.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.