research report

This report presents the findings of a qualitative evaluation of the Jobseeker Mandatory Activity (JMA) pilot. The JMA provided extra support to help Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA) claimants back into the labour market.

The focus was on those aged 25 years or more that had been claiming benefits for six months. The intervention comprised a three-day work-focused course delivered by external providers followed by three Jobcentre Plus personal adviser interviews. The pilot was tested in ten areas over a two-year period with the first customers entering provision in April 2006.

The Secretary of State for Scotland requested a review of arrangements for the supervision of sex offenders in the community. A team from Social Work Services Inspectorate (SWSI) carried out the review, with assistance from many organisations and individuals.

A Commitment to Protect is the report of their initial work from April to September 1997. It gives an overview of the arrangements and a broad assessment of their strengths and weaknesses, together with recommendations for improvement.

In April 1997 the Social Services Inspectorate undertook an inspection of the child protection services in Cambridgeshire's Social Services Department. This inspection took place at the request of the Parliamentary Under Secretary in the Department of Health following the non-accidental death of Rikki Neave, a child on Cambridgeshire's child protection register. The 1997 inspection identified serious deficiencies in the standard of child protection services in Cambridgeshire.

This review of services for people with learning disabilities began by looking at services, especially in social and healthcare, and their relationship with education, housing, employment and other areas. It also focused on people’s lifestyles and wider policies including social inclusion, equality and fairness, and the opportunity for people to improve themselves through continuous learning. The review also recommends that for all but a few people, health and social care should be provided in their own homes or in community settings alongside the rest of the population.

In early 2006, the Scottish Executive Justice Department commissioned a review of the available evidence on volatile substance abuse (VSA) among young people in Scotland, particularly, in relation to the prevalence and nature of VSA, successful prevention of VSA and effective communication of VSA information and messages.

This report details the findings of that review and makes recommendations for the way in which the review of evidence can be used to take forward the volatile substance abuse agenda in Scotland.

This review has inevitably drawn on a great deal of ‘soft’ or qualitative evidence that is largely narrative and anecdotal in nature. As such it contains clear accounts from people who use services about what they find beneficial.

Providers and commissioners need to make sure that additional measures of quality improvement are put in place to strengthen the evidence base.

This report presents findings of a study of public bodies’ approach to implementing the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (the DDA) and provides evidence for a baseline against which to assess the extent to which the Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (the 2005 Act) prompts authorities to promote equality of opportunity for disabled people.

This report and its companion entitled Safeguarding Children in Whom Illness is Induced or Fabricated by Carers with Parenting Responsibilities, by the Department of Health, is essential reading for all paediatricians and other members of the multi-disciplinary team in the field of child protection. The Department of Health document sets out policy and guidelines for all professionals, whereas this document discusses clinical issues in more detail and provides practical advice for paediatricians.

This news item from the Vancouver Courier reports on an argument between drug treatment and prevention and a supervised injection site.

This report, published in October 2008, examined the progress local councils and their partners are making in developing children's trusts. The report concludes that the 'children's trusts' created by the government after the death of Victoria Climbie have been confused and confusing.

Five years after the green paper Every Child Matters and eight years after the child's death, 'there is little evidence of better outcomes for children and young people' resulting from the requirement that local areas in England set up arrangements to coordinate children's services.