research report

Residential care home workforce development: the rhetoric and reality of meeting older residents' future care needs

Study that reports on how training care home staff can enhance social care and the health of older people in UK residential homes. It provides evidence of the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, discusses barriers and facilitators, and identifies challenges for the future.

Public space CCTV in Scotland: results of a national survey of Scotland's local authorities

This report is based on a survey of each of the 32 local authority areas in Scotland which was carried out between June 2007 and February 2008. The survey considered the scale and nature of the CCTV infrastructure in Scotland, the purposes for which CCTV is used, the procedures for data management, staffing and training, the evaluation of the impacts of CCTV, and, current funding and development plans.

Managing the impacts of migration: improvements and innovations

Document that reports on the progress made since the publication of 'Managing the impacts of migration: a cross-governmental approach' in June 2008.

It announces a new Migration Impacts Fund, to be paid for by charges on migrants' visa fees, that will be available to local areas for spending on projects for managing migration pressures.

Addressing in-work poverty

This report describes how the rise of poverty among children in working-families is undermining the drive to end child poverty as a whole, and what can be done about it. The existence of 'in-work' poverty has only been officially recognised in the last couple of years. Yet the steady upward trend and number of children involved mean that it should be given high priority. The report includes an in-depth analysis of the progress that has been made on in-work poverty among children since the start of the government's poverty programme in the late 1990s.

The self-esteem society

Report advocating a rethinking of how self-esteem is understood in the UK. It argues that it should be considered a personal tool which helps all of us live our lives and, by extension, brings wider benefits such as potentially improving the quality of society. It makes recommendations as to how the self-esteem of society as a whole can be improved.

Work fit for all - disability, health and the experience of negative treatment in the British workplace

Report based on the findings of the 2008 British Workplace Behaviour Survey which showed that disabled people and people with long-term illnesses experience more negative treatment in the workplace compared to non-disabled people. It argues this trend may have implications for government policies helping people to access and remain in employment.

Learning the hard way: a strategy for special educational needs

Report aiming to make a contribution to the debate on how best to educate children with learning difficulties by arguing that parents are the best people to decide where their children should attend school and laying out a strategy to make parental choice rather than 'expert' opinion the driver for policy.

Short-changed : spending on prison mental health care

Report analysing public spending on mental health care in prisons in England in order to determine if mental health care standards for people in prison are equivalent to those enjoyed in the community at large. It concludes more investment is required in prison mental health services if equivalence is to be achieved.

Sustaining tenancies following domestic abuse : a report of research

Report of a research project which studied the duration of tenancies of women re-housed because of domestic abuse and attempted to define the key factors which determine whether or not these tenancies are sustained.

The incarceration of drug offenders: an overview

This report published by the Beckley Foundation Drug Policy Programme in partnership with the International Centre for Prison Studies at Kings College London, revisits the topic of the incarceration of drug offenders [IDPC, UK].

Most governments make strong statements about the need to maintain, and often increase, police activity and penal sanctions for drug users. This approach, it was claimed, is based on the idea that strong enforcement, and widespread incarceration, will deter potential users and dealers from becoming involved in the illegal drug market.