guidelines

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aim to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement. The guides highlight what is considered to be good practice across community services.

The national care standards for adoption agencies have been developed to ensure that the services they provide are of high quality. They provide comprehensive guidance on the expected duty of care and service that adoption agencies should provide throughout the adoption process.

Guide intended for use by a wide range of professionals who work with and support carers to help them promote joint working with health practitioners, make them aware of issues to consider when planning initiatives and the range of methodologies available and anticipated costs and benefits of different approaches.

Document that sets out a national framework of guidance on how all agencies and professionals should work together to promote children's welfare and protect them from abuse and neglect.

It is aimed at those who work in the health and education services, the police, social services, the probation service, and others whose work brings them into contact with children and families.

It is relevant to those working in the statutory, voluntary and independent sectors. It replaces the previous version of Working Together Under the Children Act 1989, which was published in 1991.

First in a series of guides on developing and implementing Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs). While ICPs have been developed within health settings, there is a growing interest in their development across a range of treatment and social care settings to ensure that a co-ordinated, quality service is provided over the full continuum of care. Care pathways are designed to minimise delays, make best use of resources, and maximise quality of care.

This guide examines when and how integrated care pathways can be used to provide better care for people with drug problems.

This guidance has been developed for practitioners in Newcastle working with children and families and/or adults who have care of children where substance misuse is a factor, which affects their lives. It has been produced in response to the increasing problem of substance misuse and particularly the rising number of children who are referred into the child protection arena due to parental substance misuse.

Guide intended to bridge the gap between school and further and higher education by providing those who work in the area with information about the support available for disabled students in further and higher education in England.

CAA is the new framework for the independent assessment of local public services in England. This document sets out how it will be delivered from April 2009.

Part 1 gives an executive summary and framework overview.

Part 2 details the framework and what it will deliver and describes area assessment, organisational assessments, and how CAA will be carried out. Further sections cover improvement and inspection planning, reporting CAA, the evolution of assessment and reviewing and evaluating CAA.

What are effective ways to interact with older patients, particularly with those facing multiple illnesses, hearing and vision impairments, or cognitive problems? How does one approach sensitive topics such as driving privileges or assisted living? Are there special communication strategies that can help older patients who are experiencing confusion or memory loss? It is with these questions in mind, that the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institute of Health, developed this Handbook.

These guidelines are a revision of 'Drug Misuse and Dependence: Guidelines on Clinical Management' published in 1991. A comprehensive set of guidance is provided for doctors in the assessment, treatment and management of drug users and drug misuse.