guidelines

Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) Guide 49 published in May 2013. Review date is May 2016

This guide is about enabling people who want to die at home to do so and improving the quality of care they receive. In the context of this guide, ‘home’ means the place where a person usually lives. This includes ‘extra care’, sheltered housing accommodation and tenancy-based accommodation such as supported living, but not care homes. The guide is aimed at practitioners and managers supporting people with end of life care needs across the health, social care and housing sectors.

Guidance on responding to allegations against foster or kinship carers that reflects the National Guidance and covers situations where the concerns relate to situations where significant harm means that a child protection response is required, as well as situations where the concerns are about the general well being of the child but where no significant harm has been identified.

Sixteen page guide that offers strategies for engaging with men in, or attached to, families in which a child is at risk or may become so.

It has been developed from a two-year project (2011-2013) in the UK, led by the Fatherhood Institute in partnership with the Family Rights Group and funded by the Department for Education’s Voluntary and Community Sector Grant. 

Handbook for parents of disabled children and young people receiving personal budgets. It contains information, examples of good practice and links to useful documents.

Rapid review that pulls together evidence from three very different countries on how each has conceptualised the problem of child poverty and how they have tried to prevent or reduce it. The various strategies used are in line with the particular countries’ overall social policy practice and view towards people living in poverty. The countries were selected based on their diversity to one another and the unique lessons each can bring to bear on NI. 

For more outcomes-focused resources, see the Outcomes Toolbox.

Taking an outcomes approach means engaging with the person and significant others to find out what matters to them, what they hope for and what they want to be different in their lives. An outcomes approach involves thinking about what role the person themselves might play in achieving their outcomes, which can be a significant shift from more traditional services where the solutions are viewed as located on the service side.

This guide looks at what is required to ensure quality assessment and planning in developing an outcomes-focused approach.

Designed to guide health professionals through the national information resources available to support effective communication with parents and improve maternal and child health outcomes.

It covers pre-conception, pregnancy, infancy, toddler and the pre-school period up to the age of 5 years. It also signposts to related services and resources to support parents and carers.

Guide that outlines some suggestions to help parents limit the risk of their child having negative experiences online and understand what action can be taken if they do.

This guide also suggests some resources that will help children get the most out of the Internet at home and in the community. It presents some case studies of actual experiences people with learning disabilities and autism have had online and learning points that can be taken from these experiences.

The Troubled Families programme is about change – for families and for services, and this report is an aid for that change. It is a tool to help local authorities and their partners, who have asked for guidance on how best to work with troubled families, and for the evidence about family intervention to be brought together in one place.

The report looks at academic evidence, local evaluations of practice, what practitioners have told us works in their services and what families tell us makes this work different and successful for them.