government publication

Breaking the cycle: effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders (Green paper evidence report)

This report has been produced by the Ministry of Justice’s Analytical Services Directorate to provide a context for the policy options set out in the Green Paper ‘Breaking the cycle: effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders’.

It summarises the main findings emerging from an assessment of a variety of evidence sources that have been reviewed to support policy development on rehabilitation and sentencing in recent months.

This evidence includes published research and statistics, as well as bespoke analyses of survey and administrative data.

Breaking the cycle: effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders

The safety and security of the law-abiding citizen is a key priority of the coalition government. Everyone has a right to feel safe in their home and in their community. When that safety is threatened, those responsible should face a swift and effective response. People rely on the criminal justice system to deliver that response: punishing offenders, protecting the public, and reducing reoffending.

Social indicators [January 2011]

This Research Paper summarises a wide range of social statistics. Subjects covered include crime and justice, defence, education, elections, health and population. This edition includes an article on "The CPI – uprating benefits and pensions". The Topical subject page includes information about fuel poverty and seasonal flu statistics.

Drug strategy 2010 reducing demand, restricting supply, building recovery: supporting people to live a drug free life

This strategy sets out the Government’s approach to tackling drugs and addressing alcohol dependence, both of which are key causes of societal harm, including crime, family breakdown and poverty.

Understanding child contact cases in Scottish sheriff courts

Parents or grandparents who cannot agree arrangements to see children with whom they do not live may turn to the courts to resolve their disputes. The Scottish court system puts children at the centre of decisions that affect them. A key mechanism for this is the Child Welfare Hearing (CWH), which parties must attend, in which sheriffs have extensive powers to intervene.

National guidance for child protection in Scotland

Since the Scottish Office guidance, Protecting Children – A Shared Responsibility, was published in 1998, the child protection landscape in Scotland has developed considerably. New legislation, new areas of practice and new approaches have shaped activity at both national and local level.

Gypsies/Travellers in Scotland: the twice yearly count No. 15 January 2009

In July 1998, the former Scottish Executive introduced a series of twice yearly counts of this population (undertaken in January and July) to establish standardised and consistent estimates across Scotland. The purpose of the count is to better understand the characteristics of this population and to assist and inform the development of public policies and services for Gypsies/Travellers, both nationally and locally.

Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2001

This paper describes the system by which the Registrar General for Scotland collects information on drug-related deaths in Scotland and presents selected statistical information covering the period 1996 to 2001.

Protecting children, supporting parents: a consultation document on the physical punishment of children

Document which summarises and assesses the governments proposals regarding 'reasonable chastisement' and goes on to discuss the government's refusal to consult on the abolition of this defence as a prelude to a ban on physical punishment.

Consultation on the proposal to develop an acknowledgement and accountability approach for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse

Consultation developed with the National Reference Group, set up to implement the recommendations of Survivor Scotland.

This paper was designed to draw on the views and experiences of survivors particularly and it was acknowledged from the start that more innovative methods were needed to ensure that this happened. A number of events were held with survivors and survivor organisations to raise their awareness of the consultation and engage them in discussions.

Group and individual interviews were also carried out with survivors, facilitated by survivor organisations.