evidence summary

The public and the justice system: attitudes, drivers and behaviour - a literature review

Literature review that aims to address a gap in our knowledge base around what the public think and feel about the justice system and why, and what consequences this has for the system itself.

Strengths-based approaches for working with individuals (IRISS Insights, no16)

One of a series of evidence summaries to support evidence-informed practice in social services in Scotland.

This Insight provides an overview of the research evidence on effective strengths based approaches for working with individuals and presents selected illustrative examples.

Effective engagement in social work education. A good practice guide on involving people who use services and carers

This good practice guide is based on research conducted in 2008 to explore the extent of service user and carer involvement in the higher and further education sectors in west and southeast Scotland.

'We've got to talk about outcomes...': a review of the Talking Points personal outcomes approach

Review which establishes the nature of activity in respect of the approach across partnerships and providers across Scotland, in particular since an earlier review in 2008. It is based primarily on interviews with forty key informants (from partnerships, providers and national organisations) and responses from a sample of those already using Talking Points to a web-based survey. Talking Points is an approach which focuses on assessing the outcomes important to the individual, planning how they will be achieved and reviewing the extent to which they have been attained.

What the millennium cohort study can tell us about the challenges new parents face: statistics for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

Report that provides an overview of statistics, from the MCS and other, comparable, data sources, about the attitudes, experiences and challenges faced by new parents in each of the four countries of the UK.

Shaping the criminal justice system: The role of those supported by criminal justice services (IRISS Insights, No. 13)

One of a series of evidence reports to support social services in Scotland.

This Insight focuses on the issue of involving those who have offended in shaping the criminal justice system, exploring the different models of involvement, the effectiveness of different approaches and the implications for Criminal Justice Social Work services.

Integration of health and social care (IRISS Insights, no.14)

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

This Insight is based on the key findings of a review conducted for ADSW (Petch, 2011), which considered the evidence base for health and social care integration.

Short breaks for disabled children: Briefing papers pack

This is a series of briefing papers produced to help local authorities, providers and families work together to improve the range and quality of short breaks for disabled children.

Measuring personal outcomes: challenges and strategies (IRISS Insights, no.12)

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics. This Insight, written by Dr Emma Miller, Honorary Senior Research Associate at Glasgow School of Social Work, considers some of the challenges of measuring outcomes and emerging responses to these.

Evaluation of local housing strategies co-production pilots with disabled people

The evaluation involved a literature review to consider the co-production approach in more depth and understand how it is applied in other sectors. This showed that coproduction is best described by its underlying principles and values rather than by a precise definition. The term refers to the empowerment of service users and frontline staff to achieve an agreed outcome or service, usually, but not always, within a social care context. Services are developed ‘with’ and ‘by’ people rather than ‘for’ them, and the engagement should be from beginning to end of the process.