evidence summary

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Systematic maps aim to describe the existing research literature on a broad topic area and also highlight any gaps. This systematic map includes research on the experience of depression in various BME older populations and the use of services in the UK.

This progress map summary includes key research findings from a C4EO knowledge review about how to improve disabled children's access to play, sport, leisure and cultural activities.

The summary includes challenge questions which can be used as tools for strategic leaders in assessing, delivering and monitoring disabled children's access to services. Key findings discussed include what are inclusive services, what disabled children want from play and leisure services and barriers to access and participation.

Analytical discussion paper providing a framework for understanding the family, pinpoint how it has changed and, taking into account the evidence, stating the principles guiding the UK Government's family policy.

Good communication, both oral and written, is at the heart of best practice in social work. Communication skills are essential for establishing effective and respectful relationships with service users, and are also essential for assessments, decision making and joint working with colleagues and other professionals.

Report giving an overview of the use of penalty notices for disorder for 10- to 15-year-olds in six pilot police force areas in England and Wales between July 2005 and June 2006.

In June 1998 the Government published “Speaking up for Justice”, a report of an Interdepartmental Working Group on the treatment of Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses in the Criminal Justice System. It proposed a coherent and integrated scheme to provide appropriate support and assistance for vulnerable or intimidated witnesses. This is a summary report of the key recommendations, legislation and implementation.

Today, it is widely agreed by experts across the world that early intervention can be of enormous benefit to children. That is why, as this paper sets out, the government is investing in a number of evidence-based prevention and early intervention programmes and supporting their roll out across the country.

This document draws together a wealth of research and good practice with the aim of supporting Children’s Trust Boards and their constituent partners to bring greater consistency, rigour and impact to the way early intervention is organised and delivered locally.

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.