document

Challenging systems, changing lives: a manifesto 2011-2015

Scotland is facing a significant reduction in available resources for public services. With some protection offered to the NHS and clear expectations on local authorities in relation to performance and a council tax freeze, social work and social care face an unprecedented challenge.

This document details the Association of Directors of Social Work's (ADSW) plans to provide professional leadership at a time where transformational change is required in public services.

Scottish Care launch manifesto

The Scottish Care “Manifesto for the future of care and support services for older people in Scotland” has been published. The manifesto is a means to highlight current concerns and outlines proposals for the way forward for care and support services in Scotland.

Integrating health and social care budgets

Over the last decade, Britain’s public services have faced a number of challenges related to a changing population profile, growing demands from more assertive users, and the need for a more sustainable model of delivery. The UK’s huge fiscal deficit will now add the most pressing and complicated challenge of all: cutting expenditure on public services while maintaining quality and user satisfaction.

How to reduce youth crime and anti-social behaviour by Going Round in Circles

Mackenzie outlines a scheme to provide greater adult and community support young people at risk of falling into a life of crime and young offenders. Ippr’s research has already shown that the most prolific criminals begin offending between the ages of 10 and 13, and that a lack of adult support is a key risk factor for young people turning to crime. Simon MacKenzie has proposed creating mentoring circles for these young people, based on a model already used in Canada.

In-work poverty in the recession

The share of poor households accounted for by working households (as opposed to workless households) has been increasing in the UK over the last decade, with more than half of poor children living in working households before the recession. This note presents new data explaining what has happened to in-work poverty since the recession began, using newly released data covering the period April 2008 to March 2009.

Personalisation, productivity and efficiency

This report examines the potential for personalisation, particularly the mechanism of self-directed support and personal budgets, to result in cost efficiencies and improved productivity as well as improved care and support, resulting in better outcomes for people's lives. It provides an overview of some emerging evidence on efficiency from the implementation of personalisation so far.

Newly qualified social worker resource

This resource has been designed to support you to meet the 12 outcomes statements contained in the NQSW framework in adult services developed by Skills For Care. You will find useful resources, suggestions for evidence and links to current legislation and policy to help your continuing professional development. Although the primary focus is on adult services, social workers in other settings will also find it useful.

SCIE systematic research reviews: guidelines (2nd edition)

SCIE has a commitment to producing rigorous, high-quality knowledge products. Central in this process is the systematic research review, which combines different types of research knowledge about a social care related topic, drawing on evidence of effectiveness, the views of users and providers, and organisational issues. This guidance updates and clarifies SCIE’s expectations, updating the original guidance (2006). It also introduces SCIE’s new approach to assessing the economic impact of social care practices.

Communication training for care home workers: outcomes for older people, staff, families and friends

This briefing draws on a range of UK and internationally published research to look at training to improve nursing and residential care workers' communication skills.

The contribution of social work and social care to the reduction of health inequalities: four case studies

This briefing argues that support given as social care can help improve health and reduce health disadvantage. Improving access to social care interventions is therefore important to any strategy for reducing health inequality. The concept of health inequalities refers to the avoidable health disadvantage people experience as a result of adverse social factors, such as lack of economic or social capital, or marginalisation. People with higher socio-economic position in society have better life chances and more opportunities to flourish. They also have better health.