Seizing the opportunity: telecare strategy 2008-2010

This strategy sets out the Scottish Government’s expectations of further developments in telecare: telecare to contribute significantly to the achievement of personalised health and social care outcomes for individuals; telecare to contribute significantly to delivering wider national benefits in areas such as shifting the balance of care and the management of long-term health conditions; and local partnerships to mainstream telecare within local service planning.

Integrated Care for Drug Users : principles and practice

This document sets out the rationale for integrated care and its wider context. It provides definitions and concepts of integrated care and its key elements: accessibility, assessment, planning and delivery of care, information sharing, monitoring and evaluation. Evidence is also provided from research literature, focus groups and consultation on the key issues that influence effective practice in integrated care. Key principles and elements of effective practice drawn from the evidence are also explained.

Insight 6 : Meeting the Needs of Children from Birth to Three : Research Evidence and Implications for Out-of-Home Provision

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Tackling multiple deprivation in communities : considering the evidence (Research findings no.38/2009)

Report providing an understanding of the context for geographically focused community regeneration activity in Scotland, assessing the impacts of previous community regeneration interventions and sketching out the challenges for policy makers in developing effective community regeneration approaches in the future.

Evaluation of the working for families fund (2004-2008)

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.