document

Report setting out the findings of a Rapid Evidence Assessment of international literature on effective substance misuse services for homeless people which reviewed good practice in other countries to discover if Scotland could learn any lessons from them.

NHS Education for Scotland (NES) produced this guide through its Healthcare Chaplaincy Training and Development Unit. It was prepared for the guidance of the Spiritual Care Development Committee, a multi-faith group which represents the main faith and belief groups in Scotland and also includes representatives from chaplaincy, the health service and the Scottish Executive Health Department. The group is a forum for discussing ideas and issues concerning spiritual and religious care within NHS Scotland.

Webpage describing a project which developed an organisational model trialed in Sicily, Italy which streamlined the legal and other procedures involved in international adoptions.

This workbook sets out to show how social care governance is made up of many of social care’s core activities, familiar to practitioners. It puts social care governance into direct practice by taking a team audit approach. This helps teams reflect on and evaluate their practice, using the knowledge SCIE has gathered, to make improvements. The audit framework helps the wider organisation to learn from practice.

This strategy sets out the Scottish Government’s expectations of further developments in telecare: telecare to contribute significantly to the achievement of personalised health and social care outcomes for individuals; telecare to contribute significantly to delivering wider national benefits in areas such as shifting the balance of care and the management of long-term health conditions; and local partnerships to mainstream telecare within local service planning.

‘Commissioning’ is a word that is increasingly heard by those who work with children, young people and their families. This publication has been written specifically for community organisations to help them understand commissioning and seize the opportunities that this process affords. These include the opportunity to use their local knowledge to shape services for children and young people, as well as being funded to deliver those services.

This document sets out the rationale for integrated care and its wider context. It provides definitions and concepts of integrated care and its key elements: accessibility, assessment, planning and delivery of care, information sharing, monitoring and evaluation. Evidence is also provided from research literature, focus groups and consultation on the key issues that influence effective practice in integrated care. Key principles and elements of effective practice drawn from the evidence are also explained.

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

This review covers effective practice in parenting support within the youth justice. It was commissioned to serve as a background source document on which the accompany guidance produced 'Key Elements of Practice - Parenting' is based. It is aimed primarily at managers and practitioners working in the youth justice field who are directly involved in providing, or brokering access to, services for young people who offend and their families. It offers an accessible guide to the current state of the evidence base on effective interventions and services.