document

The purpose of the research is to explore access to, and initial responses of, services for young people with potential maltreatment issues in order to: inform future policy, inform practitioners in statutory and voluntary agencies, and inform future training of practitioners working with young people.

The report of the review, which follows the publication of the White Paper, Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS, sets out the proposals for ALBs in the health and social care sector. These proposals form part of the cross-government strategy to increase accountability and transparency, and to reduce the number and cost of quangos.

The UK Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) is often asked to contribute to national, European and international discussions and initiatives designed to improve responses to tackling child sexual abuse content on the internet. Wherever beneficial it shares our model and expertise with organisations, companies, governments and agencies around the world to enable others to understand how the UK partnership approach and industry self-regulation is successful in the UK, as well as how the range of services provided have helped to minimise online child sexual abuse content in the UK and beyond.

A review of shared services across the Clyde Valley which sets out a “road map” for the eight Clyde Valley authorities (East Dunbartonshire, West Dunbartonshire, North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow, Inverclyde) to move to a model of integrated service delivery in certain key areas over the next five years. Its recommendations include:

This report contains the views and concerns of people with HIV aged 50 and over, living into an old age that many of them never expected to see. The social care needs of this rapidly growing group have not previously been addressed in the UK. The 50 Plus research project asked 410 of them – 1 in 25 of all those currently being seen for care – for their views on their current and future lives. The report also analysed the resulting data to compare three of the largest subgroups: gay/bisexual men, black African women and white heterosexuals.

This statistics release presents the latest figures for self-directed support (direct payments). The figures apply to payments made during the period 1st April 2009 to 31st March 2010 under section 12B of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968. People who receive self-directed support (direct payments) are able to purchase and manage for themselves some or all of the care they have been assessed as needing. They are one way of increasing the flexibility, choice, and control people have over the care they receive, so that they can live more independently in their communities.

A report of research carried out by the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen) on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions. The report documents the findings from the 2008 Families and Children Study (FACS).

This review assesses the Youth Courts’ impact on reoffending rates, with regard to the impact on the Youth Courts of the recent reforms of summary justice. The current administration announced in January 2008 that a decision would be made about any further Youth Courts in the light of this review.

Pilot Drug Courts were introduced in October 2001 in Glasgow and in August 2002 in Fife. Following broadly positive evaluations of the pilot schemes in 2006, Scottish Ministers agreed to continue funding the Drug Courts for a further 3 years until Spring 2009. The purpose of this review is to assess the impact and effectiveness of the two Drug Courts, including cost effectiveness, in light of the impact of the summary justice reforms.