book

This book is based on a research project that explored how young men and women use alcohol as they move from their mid teens through to their late twenties. This period of life
is sometimes referred to as ‘the transition to adulthood’. We wanted to find out more about young people’s experiences of drinking during this time in their lives. To explore this in a dynamic way, we conducted eight activity based focus groups with young adults aged between 16–30.

Second edition of book that provides an update on the impact of parental problems, such as substance misuse, domestic violence, learning disability and mental illness, on children’s welfare.

Research, and in particular the biennial overview reports of serious case reviews (Brandon et al 2008; 2009; 2010), have continued to emphasise the importance of understanding and acting on concerns about children’s safety and welfare when living in households where these types of parental problems are present.

The current Labour government has made a commitment to abolish child poverty in Britain by 2020. In its efforts to do so, a number of targets have been established and indicators of progress are being reviewed annually. However, tackling severe child poverty does not feature in these targets or indicators. In fact, although there is now a wealth of information about child poverty in Britain, very little is known about either the extent of severe child poverty or the children who are affected.

In Scotland co-production is no longer just a ‘nice idea’ but a necessity to deal with increasing health inequalities (Sir Harry Burns) and changing demographics and expectations (Gerry Power).

This book shows how and why Scotland has become one of the leaders in public service co-production – and how the lessons learnt so far can be applied more widely.