article

The science of prevention for children and youth

Paper that makes the case that prevention science provides a framework for ensuring that prevention initiatives are founded on robust evidence and implemented in a way that will allow progressive growth in knowledge of 'what works' in prevention.

It examines some of the opportunities and challenges in a shift to an evidence-based prevention agenda to improve the lives of children and young people.

How bureaucracy is derailing personalisation

Article that asks why bureaucracy is derailing personalisation and what can be done to rescue the policy.

Evidence-based practice: a mind-altering substance. A blended learning course teaching information literacy for substance use prevention work

Paper which describes the rationale and philosophy behind the development of a blended learning course for allied health professionals working in the field of substance use prevention and the results of an evaluation of the pilot course.

The course teaches a range of information literacy skills in order to increase the participants’ knowledge of evidence-based practice and enable them to pursue an evidence-based approach in their professional work.

Response to the Scottish Government's Child Poverty Strategy Consultation

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation's response to the Scottish Government's consultation on a Child Poverty Strategy.

This submission draws on our research evidence relating to child poverty including statistics about poverty and social exclusion in Scotland from JRF’s annual Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion reports.

'Taking it to heart': girls and the meanings of violence

This article highlights the importance of social and situational context to an understanding of girls’ violence (and to girls’ understanding of violence). The research study that forms the basis of the chapter commenced, in Scotland, against a back-drop of increasing concern in Britain about violence by, and amongst, young people.

Chaos, containment and change: responding to persistent offending by young people

This article reviews policy developments in Scotland concerning ‘persistent young offenders’ and then describes the design of a study intended to assist a local planning group in developing its response. The key findings of a review of case files of young people involved in persistent offending are reported.

Discussing violence: let's hear it for the girls

This article presents some key findings from an exploratory study of teenage girls’ views and experiences of violence, carried out in Scotland. Using data gathered from self-report questionnaires, focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, it conveys girls’ perceptions of violence and discusses the nature and extent of the many forms of violence in girls’ lives. In particular, the article flags up the pervasiveness of verbal conflicts within girls’ lives and outlines the characteristics of those girls who describe themselves as violent.

'Prove me the bam!’: victimisation and agency in the lives of young women who commit violent offences

This article reviews the evidence regarding young women’s involvement in violent crime and, drawing on recent research carried out in HMPYOI Cornton Vale in Scotland, provides an overview of the characteristics, needs and deeds of young women sentenced to imprisonment for violent offending. Through the use of direct quotations, the article suggests that young women’s anger and aggression is often related to their experiences of family violence and abuse, and the acquisition of a negative worldview in which other people are considered as being ‘out to get you’ or ‘put one over on you’.

Shadow writing and participant observation: a study of criminal justice social work around sentencing

The study of decision-making by public officials in administrative settings has been a mainstay of law and society scholarship for decades. The methodological challenges posed by this research agenda are well understood: how can socio-legal researchers get inside the heads of legal decision-makers in order to understand the uses of official discretion?