article

This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working.

Paper that analyses the relationship between having one or more father figures and the likelihood that young people engage in delinquent criminal behaviour. It pays particular attention to distinguishing the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers.

Paper that analyses trends in newspaper coverage of mental illness in the UK between 1992-2008 across a range of psychiatric diagnoses.

Paper that makes the case that prevention science provides a framework for ensuring that prevention initiatives are founded on robust evidence and implemented in a way that will allow progressive growth in knowledge of 'what works' in prevention.

It examines some of the opportunities and challenges in a shift to an evidence-based prevention agenda to improve the lives of children and young people.

Paper which describes the rationale and philosophy behind the development of a blended learning course for allied health professionals working in the field of substance use prevention and the results of an evaluation of the pilot course.

The course teaches a range of information literacy skills in order to increase the participants’ knowledge of evidence-based practice and enable them to pursue an evidence-based approach in their professional work.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation's response to the Scottish Government's consultation on a Child Poverty Strategy.

This submission draws on our research evidence relating to child poverty including statistics about poverty and social exclusion in Scotland from JRF’s annual Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion reports.

This article highlights the importance of social and situational context to an understanding of girls’ violence (and to girls’ understanding of violence). The research study that forms the basis of the chapter commenced, in Scotland, against a back-drop of increasing concern in Britain about violence by, and amongst, young people.

This article reviews policy developments in Scotland concerning ‘persistent young offenders’ and then describes the design of a study intended to assist a local planning group in developing its response. The key findings of a review of case files of young people involved in persistent offending are reported.

This article presents some key findings from an exploratory study of teenage girls’ views and experiences of violence, carried out in Scotland. Using data gathered from self-report questionnaires, focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, it conveys girls’ perceptions of violence and discusses the nature and extent of the many forms of violence in girls’ lives. In particular, the article flags up the pervasiveness of verbal conflicts within girls’ lives and outlines the characteristics of those girls who describe themselves as violent.