social networks

Working paper based on a series of pilot interviews with 15 community groups that began their activities as informal or ‘below the radar’ community organisations, aims to explore:

Survey which aimed to find out more about the levels of isolation families with disabled children experience and how this impacts on their family life. It also explores what would help families most when they feel isolated and whether the growth of the internet and social networks help.

Alcohol marketing on the internet is growing rapidly, with the alcohol industry utilizing a range of new and interactive techniques to reach existing and new customers. Of particular concern is the presence of alcohol companies on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, and video sharing sites such as YouTube, given that huge numbers of children and young people use these sites on a regular basis, and are consequently at risk of exposure to marketing intended for adults.

Paper that briefly reviews evidence and current thinking about the links between social networks and poverty, and explores how dimensions of ‘race’ and ethnicity affect how these operate for people living in the UK.

It focuses mainly on the experiences of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities and identifies how social network effects contribute to the occurrence of poverty, coping strategies and routes out of poverty.

Paper commissioned to inform the work of the JRF poverty and ethnicity programme, which aims to understand the underlying reasons for variations in low income and deprivation among different ethnic groups in the UK and the problems caused. It also aims to contribute towards solutions to these problems.

The report explains what social networks are, and their benefits; explores how social networks can help address poverty and be made more accessible; and discusses the impacts of government spending cuts on social networks.

Report by EU Kids Online on how young people use the internet to communicate with others.

EU Kids Online is funded by the EC Safer Internet Programme (contract SIP-KEP-321803) from 2009-11 to enhance knowledge of children’s and parents’ experiences and practices regarding risky and safer use of the internet and new online technologies.

In 2009, the LGiU’s Children’s Services Network set up a special project in partnership with Practical Participation and other specialists to work with representatives from 30 local authorities. The project has provided useful insights into the mass phenomenon of social networking sites and the
opportunity they present for engaging young people in democratic activity.

10 minute drama about a 15 year old girl called Dee, who makes a common mistake of many teens and sends indecent photos of herself to her boyfriend Si. Without thinking of the consequences, Si sends the photos to a friend and very quickly the images become public.

A distressed Dee is helped through the situation by her alter-ego. Together they come to terms with the consequences of her actions and learn where to go for help and advice.