social mobility

Series of articles by various authors on the subject of child poverty. Topics covered include: social mobility, employment, Sure Start, child protection, well-being and early years education.

Research demonstrates a negative relationship between worklessness and outcomes for children over and above what would be expected due to other factors, such as material deprivation and low income. This underlines the importance of supporting parents to move into the labour market.

This briefing looks at the importance of employment to social mobility.

Child poverty affects many aspects of children’s lives and their future social mobility. Research identifies a range of detrimental outcomes for children which are associated with child poverty as well as the key barriers to moving out of poverty.

This briefing looks at the effect of child poverty on social mobility.

A growing body of research suggests that good parenting skills and a supportive home learning environment are positively associated with children’s early achievements and wellbeing. Hence interventions to improve the quality of home and family life can increase social mobility.

This briefing looks at how parenting styles affects child development and social mobility.

Health – specifically health inequality – is a hugely significant factor in social mobility. This briefing looks at how health inequalities continue to undermine social mobility.

The all-party group was formed to discuss and promote the cause of social mobility; to raise issues of concern and help inform policy makers and opinion formers.

Its particular focus is on understanding what social mobility is, and what has/does/could impact it - both in policy terms and in more informal, cultural ways.

Educational performance appears to be one of the main barriers which stop people moving out of poverty. Yet studies indicate that poorer children are still failing to achieve their educational potential.

This briefing paper looks at the importance of education for social mobility.

Paper that argues strongly that the government is correct to take the bold step of embracing the firm evidence on child development in seeking to create a strategy that "sets out plans to support a culture where the key aspects of good parenting are widely understood and where all parents can benefit from advice and support...what is needed is a much wider culture change towards recognising the importance of parenting, and how society can support mothers and fathers to give their children the best start in life".