social media

Study that examines the relevance of social media to the development of personalised social care in general, and to self-directed support in particular.

The focus of the report is the UK but, given the global nature of web-based communication, it does include some international initiatives.

A social media website dedicated to building a community that aims to include disabled people in the design of everyday household products from their living rooms, and where people can share ideas and tips on how to overcome everyday challenges they face with appliances and technology.

The site was created by the Blackwood Foundation an independent subsidiary of Blackwood (previously known as Margaret Blackwood Housing Association). The Blackwood Foundation supports people to live independently and to get the most out of life.

Alcohol marketing on the internet is growing rapidly, with the alcohol industry utilizing a range of new and interactive techniques to reach existing and new customers. Of particular concern is the presence of alcohol companies on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, and video sharing sites such as YouTube, given that huge numbers of children and young people use these sites on a regular basis, and are consequently at risk of exposure to marketing intended for adults.

Research that has been undertaken as part of the European Digital Youth Information Project (EDYIP), a networking project on the theme of online information for young people. The aim of the research is to provide insights into the issues that young people face when searching for online information in order to inform the development of good practice on how best to reach young people through the internet.

Document that outlines 8 main findings and recommendations from the research ‘Munch, Poke, Ping’ which the Training and Development Agency (TDA) commissioned Stephen Carrick-Davies to undertake in 2011.

The focus of the research was to consider the risks which vulnerable young people, excluded from schools and being taught in Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), encounter online and through their mobile phones.

Despite older age being the best time of life to be using the Internet, more than 5.7 million UK over-65-year-olds have never been online. Internet access should play a key role in successful ageing and help build links across generations and geographies for the UK’s older people, yet millions remain excluded from social, financial and developmental opportunities that the vast majority of the UK population now takes for granted.

Paper commissioned to inform the work of the JRF poverty and ethnicity programme, which aims to understand the underlying reasons for variations in low income and deprivation among different ethnic groups in the UK and the problems caused. It also aims to contribute towards solutions to these problems.

The report explains what social networks are, and their benefits; explores how social networks can help address poverty and be made more accessible; and discusses the impacts of government spending cuts on social networks.