social care

The description of care trusts as either the ‘vanguard’ of integrated organisations or a ‘lost tribe’ was made by the former Chief Executive of a care trust at an HSMC learning event soon after their creation. It nicely captures the mixed views of care trusts as either the cutting edge of integration between health and social care or as a band of individuals and organisations that have happened upon a clumsy structural solution as a way of shielding themselves from other agendas.

Underpinning social care is a value-base that includes a commitment to empower service users, to promote social inclusion and to demonstrate a respect for diversity. Realising these values means developing awareness and understanding of how they translate into particular ways of working with different groups and individual service users. This OutLine identifies five key approaches for promoting more equitable provision for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. It is supported by a range of examples taken from the evidence base for social care and sexuality.

This document, and its Annexes, is the IA of the Health and Social Care Bill.

It assesses the benefits, costs and risks of implementing the policies proposed in the NHS White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS that require primary legislation.

Web resource that brings together a number of case studies to show the wide range of short breaks available.

Key topics include: breaks with friends; specialist support for young people with physical disabilities; activity based breaks; breaks for young carers; breaks for older people; breaks for couples together; breaks for people living alone; breaks for people who have to pay for their own break; breaks with additional support; breaks with families; breaks for people with dementia; and breaks of a few hours each week.

SCIE has a commitment to producing rigorous, high-quality knowledge products. Central in this process is the systematic research review, which combines different types of research knowledge about a social care related topic, drawing on evidence of effectiveness, the views of users and providers, and organisational issues. This guidance updates and clarifies SCIE’s expectations, updating the original guidance (2006). It also introduces SCIE’s new approach to assessing the economic impact of social care practices.

This briefing argues that support given as social care can help improve health and reduce health disadvantage. Improving access to social care interventions is therefore important to any strategy for reducing health inequality. The concept of health inequalities refers to the avoidable health disadvantage people experience as a result of adverse social factors, such as lack of economic or social capital, or marginalisation. People with higher socio-economic position in society have better life chances and more opportunities to flourish. They also have better health.

This resource recognises that social work/social care are made more complex by the multiple relationships with people and agencies with whom you must collaborate to get your work done. The experiences of a family, the Brooks and the professionals and agencies who work with them, illustrate a ‘model’ designed to help you in planning and reflecting on these multiple collaborations.

This report looks at good practice in social care for refugees and asylum seekers. It is primarily aimed at service commissioners and providers working in local authorities in children’s and adults’ services. It will also be of interest to asylum seeker and refugee organisations and voluntary organisations. These pointers for good practice have been developed from a review of the literature and a survey which included the views of refugees and asylum seekers, social care providers and refugee and community organisations.

The Scottish Government and COSLA are determined to ensure that carers are supported to manage their caring responsibilities with confidence and in good health, and to have a life of their own outside of caring. This is a strategy developed by the Health Boards, national carer organisations and carers, which will build on the support already in place and take forward the recommendations of the landmark report, Care 21: the future of unpaid care in Scotland.