social care

Care in crisis: causes and solutions

Report on care and support in older people's services in the UK - what has caused the current crisis and possible solutions to the problems.

Skills for care

Skills for Care is the employer led authority on the training standards and development needs of adult social care staff in England. Skills for Care work with establishments offering adult social care and training providers - both regionally and nationally - to establish standards and qualifications that will equip social care workers with the skills and knowledge needed to deliver an improved standard of care.

All in this together?: making best use of health and social care resources in an era of austerity (Policy paper 9)

Policy paper which seeks to contribute to an ongoing debate about how best to use health and social care resources to achieve the best possible outcomes in difficult financial circumstances.

The vanguard of integration or a lost tribe?: care trusts ten years on (Policy paper 10)

The description of care trusts as either the ‘vanguard’ of integrated organisations or a ‘lost tribe’ was made by the former Chief Executive of a care trust at an HSMC learning event soon after their creation. It nicely captures the mixed views of care trusts as either the cutting edge of integration between health and social care or as a band of individuals and organisations that have happened upon a clumsy structural solution as a way of shielding themselves from other agendas.

How can adult social care services become more accessible and appropriate to LGBT people? (Outline 16)

Underpinning social care is a value-base that includes a commitment to empower service users, to promote social inclusion and to demonstrate a respect for diversity. Realising these values means developing awareness and understanding of how they translate into particular ways of working with different groups and individual service users. This OutLine identifies five key approaches for promoting more equitable provision for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. It is supported by a range of examples taken from the evidence base for social care and sexuality.

Health and Social Care Bill 2011: co-ordinating document for the impact assessments and equality impact assessments

This document, and its Annexes, is the IA of the Health and Social Care Bill.

It assesses the benefits, costs and risks of implementing the policies proposed in the NHS White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS that require primary legislation.

Challenging systems, changing lives: a manifesto 2011-2015

Scotland is facing a significant reduction in available resources for public services. With some protection offered to the NHS and clear expectations on local authorities in relation to performance and a council tax freeze, social work and social care face an unprecedented challenge.

This document details the Association of Directors of Social Work's (ADSW) plans to provide professional leadership at a time where transformational change is required in public services.

Short break case studies (Shared Care Scotland)

Web resource that brings together a number of case studies to show the wide range of short breaks available. Key topics include: breaks with friends; specialist support for young people with physical disabilities; activity based breaks; breaks for young carers; breaks for older people; breaks for couples together; breaks for people living alone; breaks for people who have to pay for their own break; breaks with additional support; breaks with families; breaks for people with dementia; and breaks of a few hours each week.

SCIE systematic research reviews: guidelines (2nd edition)

SCIE has a commitment to producing rigorous, high-quality knowledge products. Central in this process is the systematic research review, which combines different types of research knowledge about a social care related topic, drawing on evidence of effectiveness, the views of users and providers, and organisational issues. This guidance updates and clarifies SCIE’s expectations, updating the original guidance (2006). It also introduces SCIE’s new approach to assessing the economic impact of social care practices.

The contribution of social work and social care to the reduction of health inequalities: four case studies

This briefing argues that support given as social care can help improve health and reduce health disadvantage. Improving access to social care interventions is therefore important to any strategy for reducing health inequality. The concept of health inequalities refers to the avoidable health disadvantage people experience as a result of adverse social factors, such as lack of economic or social capital, or marginalisation. People with higher socio-economic position in society have better life chances and more opportunities to flourish. They also have better health.