self-directed support

This report looks at some of the research findings and emerging principles and practice concerning risk enablement in the self-directed support and personal budget process while also recognising the wider context of adult safeguarding in social care. The aim is to build an evidence base drawn from both research and practice to indicate what could work to promote risk enablement, independence and control while at the same time, ensuring safety.

This ‘At a glance’ briefing highlights some of the emerging findings from research and practice regarding risk taking and safety in the implementation of self-directed support and personal budgets. The briefing summarises research findings from UK and international studies and emerging practice. The aim is to highlight evidence of what may help or hinder risk enablement and adult safeguarding in the context of promoting independence, choice and control. It also provides some examples of how practice is developing.

This report examines the potential for personalisation, particularly the mechanism of self-directed support and personal budgets, to result in cost efficiencies and improved productivity as well as improved care and support, resulting in better outcomes for people's lives. It provides an overview of some emerging evidence on efficiency from the implementation of personalisation so far.

This statistics release presents the latest figures for self-directed support (direct payments). The figures apply to payments made during the period 1st April 2009 to 31st March 2010 under section 12B of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968. People who receive self-directed support (direct payments) are able to purchase and manage for themselves some or all of the care they have been assessed as needing. They are one way of increasing the flexibility, choice, and control people have over the care they receive, so that they can live more independently in their communities.

Paper that argues that ‘demand-side’ reforms  such as Direct Payments do not on their own  result in a change of provision in the care and support market. It asks what ‘supply-side’ reforms might be needed in order to bring real choice – the choice about the shape of their lives – to those newly ‘empowered’ ‘consumers’.

It is predicted that by 2033 there will be a 50% increase in the number of people over 60 in Scotland. This is accompanied by increasing longevity.

This evidence review focuses on the spiritual care of older people as one of the ways in which person-centred care can be achieved.

The overall aim of the audit was to review how effectively the public sector commissions social care services.

It examines how well councils and their partners plan, and how councils either procure or deliver, effective social care services. It also assesses the extent to which councils and their partners involve users and carers in developing services to meet their needs, and how they work with providers in the voluntary and private sectors to provide high-quality, sustainable services.

Document that contains draft statutory guidance on the values, principles legal duties and powers associated with social care assessment, support planning and review. The guidance covers adults, children, young carers and adult carers. It has been developed by Scottish Government with contributions from a joint working group of key partners which included the Association of Directors of Social Work, Self Directed Support Scotland, Independent Living in Scotland, the Coalition of Care and Support Providers in Scotland and the Carer’s Trust.

Discussion paper that describes a way forward for developing Resource Allocation Systems (RAS) in Scotland as an essential component of a sustainable system of self-directed support. It argues that, rather than fixate on one model or system, there needs to be a period of genuine innovation and exploration in partnership with disabled people and families.