self-directed support

Resource allocation systems based upon measures of need are one widely adopted approach to estimating the cost of the individual service user’s care package in a manner directly proportionate to individual need. 

However, some recent studies have questioned the feasibility and utility of such systems, arguing that the relationship between needs and costs cannot be modelled with sufficient accuracy to provide a useful guide to individual allocation. In contrast, this paper presents three studies demonstrating that this is possible.

Video (uploaded to YouTube) produced by North Ayrshire Council on how people can have more choice and control over their social care through self-directed support.

Follow-up evaluation that is built upon the initial evaluation of the self-directed support test sites which reported in September 2011.

This follow-on study sought to assess continued uptake in the test sites; to identify activities to further promote and increase awareness of self-directed support and identify system wide change within the test site local authorities.

Briefing that provides a summary of the parliamentary scrutiny of the Social Care (Self-directed Support) (Scotland) Bill prior to the Stage 3 proceedings, due on 28 November 2012.

It outlines:
- The Health and Sport's Committee's Stage 1 report recommendations and the Scottish Government's response
- Amendments agreed to at Stage 2
- Issues that were raised at Stage 2 but did not result in amendment to the Bill
- Amendments that have been lodged for Stage 3.

Website developed by Glasgow City Council, in conjunction with partners, to provide information, advice and guidance about local services and sources of help that can support you to maintain your lifestyle and independence.

Paper that describes the background to personalisation and then goes on to offer an analysis of the different policy options that will open up citizens, professionals, families, communities and policy-makers to its potential.

Summary of a programme run in three locations - Suffolk, Calderdale and Wolverhampton. Each site recruited families who, primarily, were dissatisfied with how things were at the time, who had a vision for things being different and/or were worried about the future. Although each locality had done some information sharing with families, most participants were unaware of or deeply sceptical about personalisation.

Report that looks at the future development of personalisation at a time of limited resources. It details two seminars held in November 2011, organised by SCIE with support and funding from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF).

The seminars brought together service users, carers and a select number of people involved in practice and policy development around personalisation in adult social care.

Report that looks at how far government and other organisations are making information about social care more easily available. It examines the challenges that organisations providing home care services face in responding to service users’ choices and the help that local authorities can give these organisations to meet such challenges.

It also reviews the available research evidence on how service users, carers and professionals balance the benefits of choice against the potential risks involved.