reoffending

Home Detention Curfew (HDC) and open prison are both forms of ‘conditional liberty’, where prisoners are allowed controlled access to the community. Schemes of conditional liberty are intended to provide a gradual transition from prison to community thus facilitating a person’s reintegration. On an HDC licence, prisoners live at home but must wear an electronically monitored tag and keep to a curfew; in open prison, prisoners live at the prison but can be granted home leave and participate in activities that prepare them for release.

‘Bromley Briefings’ produced in memory of Keith Bromley, a valued friend of the Prison Reform Trust and allied groups concerned with prisons and human rights.

His support for refugees from oppression, victims of torture and the falsely imprisoned made a difference to many people’s lives.

Paper commissioned by the RSA to inform the development of a major new practical project it is considering.

It aims to set out a vision for RSA Transitions, a new model of community prison and “through the gate” provision which would be designed, built and managed around a culture of learning and social enterprise with the aim of rehabilitating people through increasing their capacity to work and resettle.

The Scottish Consortium on Crime and Criminal Justice and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research held a seminar in Glasgow on 23rd February 2010, to discuss the community payback order, which has been proposed by the Scottish Government in the Criminal Justice and Licensing (Scotland) Bill. The purpose of the seminar was to clarify the intentions behind the proposed new Scottish Order; how its success would be judged; and how it could be made both effective and acceptable, to sentencers, to the press and to the public.

Scottish Government website on reducing reoffending, which contains information on dealing with offenders, projects and initiatives, key partners, publications and legislation, and news and events.