personalisation

Counting the cost of choice and control: evidence for the costs of self-directed support in Scotland

Study with overall aim to provide macro-level financial and economic evidence on the potential costs, benefits and impacts of an increase in the uptake of SDS in Scotland.

Personalisation: lessons from social care

Paper that shows how the personalisation agenda encourages innovation, offering the potential to create new markets around localised and individual needs, to focus fiscal resources directly and discretely, and to enable small groups of individuals to ‘positively disrupt’ a complex and opaque system.

It begins with a potted history of personalisation, and ends with five recommendations for the implementation of personalisation, whatever the sector, in a way that increases the availability and use of new, community­based approaches to support and inclusion.

ISFS in action: personalising block contracts

Report that describes a ground-breaking initiative in the development of personalisation in adult social care. By working in partnership, Southwark Council has:

- Broken down a large block contract for 83 people into individual budgets
- Created Individual Service Funds (ISF) for more flexible services
- Begun creating better and more empowering services for those they serve
- Developed a more dynamic and respectful relationship between a service provider and commissioner

People not processes: the future of personalisation and independent living

Report that looks at the future development of personalisation at a time of limited resources. It details two seminars held in November 2011, organised by SCIE with support and funding from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF).

The seminars brought together service users, carers and a select number of people involved in practice and policy development around personalisation in adult social care.

Health care in care homes: a special review of the provision of health care to those in care homes

Review which aimed to look at how well the health care needs of people living in care homes were met, based on commissioning and provider behaviours. The scope for the review set out to consider practice not just in individual care homes, but to focus attention on the rights of people in care homes to access NHS services that met their needs. This included GP services and pathways for continence care, NHS support for care homes to ensure quality of health care through direct provision of district nursing services, and training for care home staff.

Care to share

This is Evaluation Support Scotland's presentation on how to evaluate your short breaks project. It was aimed at managers of projects funded by the Short Breaks Fund but useful to any third sector project that wants to develop their evaluations skills and share their learning.

Choice and control for all: the role of individual service funds in delivering fully personalised care and support

The continued drive to transform social care through personalisation and the ongoing focus of Government on personal budgets for everyone who is eligible by 2013 presents a huge challenge to the sector. Making a reality of transformation of this scale in a way that really changes lives at a time of continued pressure on public finances places great demands on councils and providers alike.

Short Breaks Fund: Round 1 evaluation report

The Short Breaks Fund was launched in November 2010 and has been made available through funding from the Scottish Government in recognition of the important contribution which carers make in caring for a loved one, and the vital role breaks play in sustaining carers and those they care for.

With a foreword by Minister for Public Health Michael Matheson this report considers what projects from the first round of funding have achieved, and captures their challenges and from this to considers what learning can be taken forward into future funding allocations.

A guide to developing a short break bureau

Shared Care Scotland exists to promote the development of more imaginative, personcentred approaches to short breaks and respite care. The carers and service users we speak to are looking for quality services which offer choice, flexibility and reliability; a range of services that meet different needs and circumstances rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach. The development of Short Break Bureaux in Scotland, involves collaborative working between the statutory and voluntary sector. This guide provides a model of service planning.

A break in communication

The paper looks at the importance of communication in building positive relationships between people who use short break services and their carers, and the people providing the service.