personalisation

For more outcomes-focused resources, see the Outcomes Toolbox.

This resource outlines the eligibility criteria developed by Dumfries and Galloway council help people self-assess their needs.

For more outcomes-focused resources, see the Outcomes Toolbox.

This booklet was developed by Dumfries and Galloway Council with people who are using services, carers, social work practitioners and managers. It outlines the values and principles of Self-Directed Support (SDS) and provides information about levels of support available. It explains the options of SDS and the development of a personal support plan.

Video (uploaded to YouTube) produced by North Ayrshire Council on how people can have more choice and control over their social care through self-directed support.

The Social Policy Research Unit examined how current English adult social care practice balances the interests of service users and family carers, in assessment, planning, on-going management and reviews of personal budgets, particularly when budget-holders have cognitive or communication impairments.

The study examined senior local authority perspectives, everyday practice by frontline staff and experiences of service users and carers.

Document that has been developed with the aim of informing policy and to fundamentally change the way things are done in Scotland in the area of youth transitions, from the top down and the bottom up.

Young people and their carers need help to achieve positive outcomes through greater personalisation, independence, choice and control of the transitions process.

The overall aim of our inquiry was to examine respite provision in Clackmannanshire for carers of adults with learning disabilities living in the family home and to look at examples of good practice in other areas. For the purpose of our study we defined respite care as short-term care that helps a family take a break from the daily routine and stress. It can be provided in the family home or in a variety of out-of-home settings and involve either time apart or time together with extra support.

This pilot project was set up by Falkirk Council to determine whether the use of vouchers for short breaks could help to address the low uptake of short breaks among people with severe and enduring mental illness and their carers, and also to provide an alternative to Direct Payments. The project was developed in response to:

The Short Breaks Fund represents a substantial investment by the Scottish Government in the development of short breaks’ provision. Scottish Government, Shared Care Scotland and the National Carer Organisations group are keen to make sure that there is a legacy from this investment, not simply in the form of additional or new short break services, but through better knowledge about what works well in short break services, and about what carers and those they care for need and value.
This report evaluates the impact of funding on 58 projects and...

Briefing which reflects on the experience of housing support providers delivering services through personalised funding arrangements and consider what has been working well, as well as highlighting some issues that have been more challenging. Particular attention is paid to support planning and to the financial arrangements associated with direct payments and individual service funding. 

A comprehensive analysis based on a “natural experiment”: the introduction of free personal care for the elderly that was implemented in Scotland in 2002, but not elsewhere in the UK. Under The Community Care and Health (Scotland) Act, people aged 65 and over are entitled to a flat rate payment of £145 per week and those who receive care in a nursing home receive an additional £65 per week. These funds are separate from living and housing costs and are intended specifically for personal care.