person-centred support

Research produced as a result of a project which aimed to consult directly with older people to ascertain their views on all aspects of social care and report on the main findings.

SRC worked in partnership with Age NI staff and peer facilitators to recruit for and run three focus groups across NI. The focus groups were held in Belfast, Cookstown and Irvinestown. In total, twenty four older people attended the focus groups – two thirds male and one third female.

This is a summary of the study. This study is the most user-centred and authoritative commentary to date on current policies and practice. The Standards We Expect project team (service users, practitioners and researchers) worked with service users, carers, front-line practitioners and managers in eight very diverse settings. Research findings published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in May 2011.

Paper that argues that ‘demand-side’ reforms  such as Direct Payments do not on their own  result in a change of provision in the care and support market. It asks what ‘supply-side’ reforms might be needed in order to bring real choice – the choice about the shape of their lives – to those newly ‘empowered’ ‘consumers’.

It is predicted that by 2033 there will be a 50% increase in the number of people over 60 in Scotland. This is accompanied by increasing longevity.

This evidence review focuses on the spiritual care of older people as one of the ways in which person-centred care can be achieved.

The overall aim of the audit was to review how effectively the public sector commissions social care services.

It examines how well councils and their partners plan, and how councils either procure or deliver, effective social care services. It also assesses the extent to which councils and their partners involve users and carers in developing services to meet their needs, and how they work with providers in the voluntary and private sectors to provide high-quality, sustainable services.