Northern Ireland

Paper that explores the operation of the parity principle in Northern Ireland (NI), drawing on experiences of Scotland. Issues considered include the background to the ‘parity principle’ in NI and other examples where it has been identified as an issue, an exploration of the range of arguments articulated as to the implications of breaking parity with GB, how the implications vary depending on the specific policy areas in question, and the likely outcomes of breaking parity in relation to measures included in the Welfare Reform Bill (Northern Ireland) 2012.

Report that looks at what has changed in the two-and-a-half years since the last report in 2009. It examines low income, work, benefits and education. What emerges is a complex picture. There has been continued long-term improvement in some areas and persistent problems in others.

There are variations both between and within geographical areas and population groups. In all of this, there is the sense that while the position is no worse than three years ago,it is also no better, and Northern Ireland is now faced by the uncertainties of public sector cuts and welfare reform.

Assessment that examines the effect that welfare reforms introduced since 2010 has had on children’s right to a decent standard of living and the potential effects of proposed changes within the Welfare Reform Bill 2012.

Strategy that has a particular focus on social work in the Health and Social Care (HSC) System which is where the majority of social workers are employed. It is intended as a guide for social workers, their employers, commissioners, education providers and regulators.

Criminal justice, education, youth justice, voluntary and private organisations are also important employers of social workers and this strategy and its proposals will support social workers in these sectors.

The Northern Ireland Social Care Council (NISCC), the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned this research with the aim of strengthening user involvement in Northern Ireland. Report 18 looks across health and social care services for children, young people and adults. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in February 2008.

Review that was launched in 2010 by the Minister of Justice, David Ford, in furtherance of the Hillsborough Castle Agreement. Undertaken by an independent team of three people, its terms of reference were to critically assess the current arrangements for responding to youth crime and make recommendations for how these might be improved within the wider context of, among other things, international obligations, best practice and financially uncertain future.

Most children are fortunate enough to have significant adults in their lives who can act as mentors or role models. However, children and young people in the care system may have limited or, in some cases, no contact with their families. The NSPCC is committed to improving outcomes for looked after children, both as individuals and as a group.

The purpose of this briefing is to look at the benefits of the independent visiting service for young people from their perspective.