maternity care

A small-scale study designed to provide a snapshot of voluntary and community organisations‟ activity in relation to maternal and infant nutrition across ethnic minority (EM) communities in Scotland.

The study was designed to provide some basic information about levels of activity, services offered and resources used to support this work. It looked for the major constraints and barriers that organisations face in working in this area and also their future learning and development needs.

Report that investigated whether there were indeed differences in early years’ experiences between Scotland and England, and between the three ‘city regions’ of Merseyside, Greater Manchester and Glasgow and the Clyde Valley (GCV), that might partly account for the poorer health status of Scotland, and these areas.

It drew on four cohort studies of children, born in Britain in 1946, 1958, 1970 and 2000, supplemented by analyses of routine data and other large scale surveys.

An international, peer-reviewed, scholarly online journal that aims to provide a forum for contemporary critical debates on the maternal understood as lived experience, social location, political and scientific practice, economic and ethical challenge, a theoretical question, and a structural dimension in human relations, politics and ethics.

Getting it Right For Every Child (GIRFEC) is an important component of Scottish Government’s goal to achieve more timeous, proportionate and appropriate services that achieve better outcomes.

Its specific remit is to ensure that universal services are based in a commonly understood, well rounded concept of wellbeing and that all relevant agencies work together to deliver effective support and early intervention where necessary in order to improve outcomes for all Scotland’s children.

Document which is intended to provide useful insight to all maternity service staff as to how they might best encourage the involvement of fathers throughout pregnancy and childbirth, and into fatherhood and family life.

It is envisaged that this document will increase awareness of the importance of fathers being engaged in maternity care as well as assisting local maternity services in the development of their own local practices and guidelines.

Expectant fathers need to be included in all aspects of maternity care and be offered opportunities to discuss their feelings and any fears they may have. Positive involvement of fathers has the potential to decrease their fear and anxiety and increase their trust and respect as well as their partner’s.

This document provides guidance for how to involve fathers in maternity care.

Training package designed to help trainers develop training for staff (such as midwives, health visitors and social workers) to develop their skills in raising sensitive issues with pregnant women.

It is designed to support the implementation of NICE guidance in maternity care with particular reference to CG110 Pregnancy and Complex Social Factors. It is also intended to have wider applicability to NICE guidance, which requires health and social care professionals to raise sensitive issues.