health and social care

Prevention has been identified as a key aspect of Scottish public service reform. In response to the findings of the Christie Commission (2011), the Scottish Government has called for a ‘decisive shift towards prevention’.

This Insight looks specifically at the prevention of isolation and loneliness amongst older people, with a particular focus on what practitioners in the fields of health and social care should bear in mind when working to tackle this important and growing issue. 

Paper that shows how the personalisation agenda encourages innovation, offering the potential to create new markets around localised and individual needs, to focus fiscal resources directly and discretely, and to enable small groups of individuals to ‘positively disrupt’ a complex and opaque system.

It begins with a potted history of personalisation, and ends with five recommendations for the implementation of personalisation, whatever the sector, in a way that increases the availability and use of new, community­based approaches to support and inclusion.

Document that is based on a report prepared for ADSW at the time of the Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Bill (Petch, 2013) and seeks to distill key evidence to assist health and social care partnerships in Scotland in their delivery of integrated care and support. It works from the premise that structural change by itself does not deliver the improved outcomes sought for service users and communities, unless equal or greater attention is paid to a range of other key factors.

Key points are as follows: 

Tool for supporting the evaluation of public involvement and participation in health services. A partner to the Participation Toolkit, it is a stand-alone guide for assessing the way in which a participation project has been undertaken (process) and the results of that activity (outcomes). It does not set out to be a definitive guide to evaluation, but aims to provide resources, references and tools to help people develop their own approach to evaluation.

The guide will:

Paper that is a result of an information-giving and consultation process which took place from mid-April to August 2013 and represents views gathered in individual and group meetings with voluntary sector service providers, large and small.

It was also influenced by discussions with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC), commissioners at locality level, Third Sector Interface leads and policy makers and the body of work relating to workforce issues that has been conducted by CCPS.

A guide to co-production in social care and how to develop co-productive approaches to working with people who use services and carers.

Document that is the second review of research evidence completed for ADSW by Professor Alison Petch from IRISS on the factors that underpin best health and social care integrated practice.

The original document, An evidence base for the delivery of adult services, published in 2011, presented the evidence for considering factors beyond those of structural change when planning to improve integrated outcomes for individuals. This latest report further adds to the knowledge base by focusing on the key dimensions for effective implementation of change.

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.

Consultation that follows on from an announcement made by the Cabinet Secretary for Health, Wellbeing and Cities Strategy on 12 December 2011, which outlined the Scottish Government’s proposals for integration of adult health and social care.

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.