government spending

Report that analyses the factors that influence the demand for health and social care, taking a long-term perspective. It shows that pressures to increase spending on health and social care will result in these services consuming an increasing proportion of gross domestic product.

The exact proportion will depend on how quickly the economy itself grows, and on the choices made about the levels of taxation, government borrowing and public spending priorities.

After 25 years of systematic data-collection and publication, the UK Government is currently no longer producing information on its spending in the voluntary sector across the UK: its last publication of these figures was for the years 2005-06.

It is now only possible to analyse current government spending in the voluntary sector in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, where data-gathering continues. This article analyses their data for the years 2004-05 to 2008-09.

This report tracks the rise in spending on children’s social care over the last decade in England and Wales, highlights how it is predicted to fall in 2011–12, and projects how this downward trend might develop in future years.

Finally, it estimates how spending reductions (particularly in early intervention) might affect the overall demand for and cost of children’s services over the medium term.

The ‘Red Book’ is the Government’s financial statement and budget report. It contains economic analysis and summarises the annual budget tax measures.

This annual publication will identify the impact of decisions made in the 2010 spending review on the lives of the most vulnerable and neglected children and young people. It is based on the views of the social care professionals working in Action for Children services. The economic literature review is provided by the Social Market Foundation.