early years

In recent years, significant national attention has been devoted to the more systematic identification and application of effective evidence-based services for families with additional needs.

Whilst recognising the importance of effective services, this briefing paper argues that having effective local systems to identify families who would benefit from additional support and to coordinate support from a range of agencies is at least as important.

Study that builds on existing research by looking specifically at the benefits in Scotland for children with no additional needs, children with moderate additional needs and children with severe additional needs.

Portal designed for those working in health or social services with responsiblity for early years (pre-birth-5 years).

Review of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) that has gathered evidence from a wide range of people working in the early years sector, including academics, practitioners, representatives of professional organisations, local authorities, parents, carers and children. Evidence has also been collected from national and international research.

Article that describes developing programmes matched to workforce needs that allow students to translate theory into professional practice.

Briefing that aims to summarise and distil the relevant research conducted by CRFR over the past 10 years and findings from the Scottish Government funded Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study which tracks the lives of 8000 Scottish families and their young children from birth. CRFR is actively involved in the analysis and dissemination of GUS findings.

Research that reviews how a national process of education reform for children aged 3-18 was under way and revision of the existing curriculum guidance for children aged three to five was being considered.

The review aims to point to examples, raise issues and look critically at evidence but makes no claims to be exhaustive.

The aim of this evaluation was to measure the effectiveness of play@home in meeting its key programme outcomes (for babies, toddlers and pre-school age children) namely, improved:

- physical activity and motor skills
- cognitive and social development
- parent-child bonding.

play@home is a physical activity promotion programme for children from birth to five years which promotes interaction and loving touch to encourage bonding between parent and child. It has been developed on the philosophy that parents and carers are children's first educators.

Aim of the research was to identify ways in which those working in early years centres might be better supported through effective CPD opportunities, designed to meet the needs of children and their families. The research was carried out between April and September 2008.