disability

Report that argues that the extra costs disabled people face is the first important challenge. It brings together new research and analysis to give a fuller picture of extra costs. It includes data gathered through a survey and in-depth interviews, as well as an investigation into the disability wealth penalty conducted by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE).

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Disabled micro-entrepreneurs are no longer waiting for job opportunities that don’t materialise. This New Zealand based pilot project was carried out as a proof of concept that such learning materials can inspire disabled youth to take charge of their career development. This idea is still at the experimental level. The project will develop these interviews into a core online curriculum for disabled youth to get inspiration from stories of unusual successes. 

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Details in a step by step format how IRISS helped Liam, a 20-year old with autism, create a video CV in order to demonstrate how someone with autism might better present their skills.

Study that explores disabled children’s experiences of living in low income families. Through interviews and group discussions involving a total of 78 disabled children and young people and 17 parents, the research identifies the difference that income makes to whether disabled children enjoy the rights set out in international law.

This research project was commissioned by Scottish Government Children and Families Analysis with the objective of undertaking an in-depth analysis of data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to examine the circumstances and outcomes of children living with a disability in Scotland. The overall aim of this analysis was to explore the impact of disability on the child, their parents and the wider family unit.

Report that builds on experience of supporting disabled people in the workplace, introduces new evidence about the labour market, and provides detailed policy analysis of the current employment support system. 

Document that argues that in the Spending Review in June the Government must invest at least £1.2 billion to address the funding gap facing disabled adults.

It draws on compelling new research from Deloitte which shows that an investment in preventative social care delivers returns for national and local government, the NHS, individuals and carers. It also ensures a modernised care system that promotes independence and prevents people having to enter crisis point to get this vital support.

Report that outlines the key findings of a survey into people’s views and concerns about bedroom tax and other changes to housing benefit in Scotland. It reveals the potentially devastating impact of one of the most controversial welfare reforms on the lives of disabled people and their families.

Paper is one of a series written to inform the development of equality outcomes for the Scottish Government. Guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) states that a range of relevant evidence relating to equality groups and communities should be used to help set equality outcomes that are likely to make the biggest difference in tackling inequalities.

The overall aim of our inquiry was to examine respite provision in Clackmannanshire for carers of adults with learning disabilities living in the family home and to look at examples of good practice in other areas. For the purpose of our study we defined respite care as short-term care that helps a family take a break from the daily routine and stress. It can be provided in the family home or in a variety of out-of-home settings and involve either time apart or time together with extra support.