criminology

Bulletin that forms part of the Scottish Government series of statistical bulletins on the criminal justice system.

Statistics are presented on criminal proceedings concluded in Scottish courts and on a range of non-court disposals issued by the police and by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service during 2010-11.

Views of postgraduate students from the MRes Criminology, the MSC Criminology and Criminal Justice, and the MSc Transnational Crime, Justice and Security programmes at the University of Glasgow, who attended the annual Scottish Association for the Study of Offending (SASO) Conference held in Dunblane, Scotland, November 2011.

The purpose of this review was to examine the available research evidence on criminal justice interventions in Scotland in terms of "effectiveness", (measured by rates of reconviction/reoffending, and reductions in drug use) and costs. The review also recognises the current policy emphasis on "recovery", which requires a wider acknowledgement of the possible mechanisms for measuring "success" and a wider vision for the process of recovery itself. It was undertaken between August and November 2010.

Statistical bulletin that forms part of a series on the criminal justice system, and shows data up to 2010-11 on Scottish prison population level and characteristics, receptions to/liberations from Scottish prisons, and international comparisons.

One of six briefing papers covering various aspects of the Scottish criminal justice system. It outlines the way in which children who commit offences are dealt with, focussing on those under the age of 16.

One of six briefing papers covering various aspects of the Scottish criminal justice system. It provides a brief description of the operation of the public prosecution system in Scotland.

Booklet, which is the fourth in a series, which offers 'tasters' of social science research projects, which have had an impact on public policy or social behaviour, and helped society to use some of the opportunities now available to address the challenges being faced. This one is based around why people turn to crime.

Research undertaken for the Equality and Human Rights Commission by the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, which explores some of the arguments for and against a gender aggravation in Scots criminal law before considering the evidence thus far of the impact the Gender Equality Duty (GED) has had on Scotland’s criminal justice system. It also makes a number of useful recommendations for the future.

Briefing paper that summarises a larger research project conducted as part of an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Edinburgh. The project examined public confidence in policing using data from the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2008/9 (SCJS).

The project aimed to find out whether confidence is primarily driven by reactive policing, or whether public confidence might be better explained by more expressive and symbolic factors, such as police conduct, community engagement and moral cohesion.