community capacity

Report produced for social care organisations, in collaboration with some of its partners – In Control, Community Service Volunteers (CSV), the Association of Directors of Adult Services (ADASS), Shared Lives Plus and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

Report based on the premise that social good best flourishes within existing forms of community.

It argues that the stronger community feeling associated with groups which citizens attend out of self-interest – e.g. ‘clubtype’ activities – helps motivate the kind of social action that the Government wants to encourage.

One of a series of evidence summaries to support evidence-informed practice in social services in Scotland.

This Insight provides an overview of the research evidence on effective strengths based approaches for working with individuals and presents selected illustrative examples.

Document that covers four strategic themes that fundamentally shape the environment in which volunteering takes place and the willingness and ability of people to contribute.

The themes include:

• Leadership – building activity and service provision around people’s strengths
• Partnership – working together to build community capacity
• Commissioning – for better outcomes and increased social value
• Volunteer support – creating good volunteering experiences that are open to all.

Pamphlet that explains why it is important for policymakers to have a better understanding of the capacity for active citizenship in their local areas. It also sets out a preliminary method for measuring the presence or absence of key mechanisms and social assets driving participation.

It puts forward an argument for a new approach to understanding and measuring active citizenship and is designed with the political and policy context in mind.

This document sets out the vision and immediate actions for reshaping the care and support of older people in Scotland.

It has been co-produced through an extensive period of development and engagement with the people of Scotland and with political, organisational and community interests at both local and national levels.

Paper that outlines the main community-based interventions that the Trust has evaluated and their impact, and identifies nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future.

The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013 (Department of Health, 2013).