child protection

Guidance for all practitioners including those working in: children and family social work; health; education; residential care; early years; youth services; youth justice; police; independent and third sector; and adult services who might be supporting parents with disabled children or involved in the transition between child and adult services.

Third annual review of child neglect in the UK undertaken by Action for Children and the University of Stirling. It emphasises the views of children and parents about seeking and receiving support.

Report that considers how well implementation of the recommendations of the review has progressed in the year since the review’s publication, and how the child protection landscape as a whole is changing. The overall conclusion of the report is that progress is moving in the right direction but that it needs to move faster. There are promising signs that some reforms are encouraging new ways of thinking and working and so improving services for children.

Guidance that aims to support and assist practitioners at all levels in every agency, to be able to approach the task of risk identification, assessment, analysis and management with more confidence and competence.

It seeks to provide tools that, if used, support methodical and systematic approaches to not only better understanding risk and its presentation with children and families, but also enhance interventions and potential outcomes.

Report based on the second in a series of annual reviews to gauge the scale of child neglect and monitor the effects of changes in national and local policy and practice.

An investigation into the relationship between professional practice, child protection and disability.

In March 2013 the Scottish Government appointed researchers from the University of Edinburgh/NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre and the University of Strathclyde, School of Social Work and Social Policy, to investigate the relationship between disabled children and child protection practice. Through interviews and focus groups, the researchers spoke with 61 professionals working on issues of disabled children and child protection in Scotland.

Little research has been done into what social workers do in everyday child protection practice. This paper outlines the broad findings from an ethnographic study of face-to-face encounters between social workers, children and families, especially on home visits.

Report that provides a high level overview of the findings of the second programme of joint inspections of child protection services carried out across all 32 council areas in Scotland between August 2009 and March 2012.

These findings, taken in context and set against the findings of the first programme, highlight progress made across Scotland since Ministers first asked for scrutiny dedicated to improving outcomes for children in need of protection.