child poverty

Report that has two broad objectives: to review anti-poverty policies over the course of a century; and to evaluate the results.

It offers a policy-focused narrative, rather than a close inspection of poverty statistics or a detailed assessment of particular anti-poverty programmes. It aims to identify the lessons that can be learnt from more than a century of public policy, with a view to determining how new policies might be
developed to eradicate poverty and reduce income inequality.

Report that provides a localised map of child poverty on the closest possible measure to that used nationally by the government.

The figures presented are for mid 2011. They show the scale of the challenge to achieve this goal, especially in some local areas. In 100 wards throughout the UK, the majority of children remain in poverty.

Paper that considers the prospects for the living standards of households with children over the period from 2010 to 2015. It analyses the impact of tax and benefit changes on these households’ incomes and on parents’ incentives to undertake paid work and to increase their earnings.

This report comes at a time when the UK government has outlined its main policy intentions and its strategy to reduce poverty. Although the statistics presented in this report still almost entirely reflect the policies of the previous government, the Labour record is the Coalition inheritance.

This commentary discusses the implications of that record for the current government in the light of its commitments on child poverty and social mobility set out in strategy documents published in 2011.

In September 2009 the Government commissioned this evaluation, to be conducted by a partnership of the Tavistock Institute for Human Relations, Bryson Purdon Social Research (BPSR) and TNS-BMRB.

Midterm report by the four Children's Commissioners that has been written in the context of their continued and ongoing dialogue with each UK administration and tier of government.

It is not a comprehensive assessment of every Article in the UNCRC. Instead it has collected evidence from their work focused on five areas: participation, disabled children, child poverty, children seeking asylum and juvenile justice. Where there is evidence it affirms progress but where there is demonstrable lack of improvement in children and young people’s lives, concerns are voiced.

Website containing reports and studies on subjects such as social attitudes, education, housing, childhood and child poverty.

A special Panorama investigation uncovers the truth about the child beggars.

Reporter John Sweeney tracks down the begging gangs to luxury homes in Romania, where he confronts the adults forcing the children to beg.

Report that highlights four key recommendations for addressing poverty in families with disabled children.

Research on what child neglect is, its impact, causes and responses to it throughout the UK.

In October 2009, Action for Children launched a dedicated campaign to raise awareness of – and funds to directly tackle – child neglect. In the course of the campaign, they spoke to a broad cross-section of society to find out what they know about neglect, if and how they see it, and how they respond to it.

The general public, childcare professionals such as nurses and nursery workers, police, social workers and children themselves were consulted.