child neglect

Evidence review that is intended to summarise the evidence in this challenging area of work and to support practitioners to reflect on their practice in this context. An enhanced understanding of trauma can enable practitioners and managers, from all the agencies working with children in care, to improve their practice with severely distressed children and to reduce the negative impact of trauma not only on children but also on the adults caring for them. 

Scottish review that builds on the first review in a series of UK wide reviews of child neglect undertaken by Action for Children in partnership with the University of Stirling and addresses three questions:

- How many children are currently experiencing neglect in Scotland?
- How good are we at recognising children who are at risk of, or are experiencing neglect?
- How well are we helping children at risk of, or currently experiencing neglect?

Report based on the second in a series of annual reviews to gauge the scale of child neglect and monitor the effects of changes in national and local policy and practice.

Paper that explores the concepts of adversity, risk, vulnerability and resilience in the context of child protection systems with the aim of contributing to the debate about the ways in which risk of ‘harm’ and ‘abuse’ are conceptualised at different stages of the lifespan and in relation to different groups of people.

Report which provides members with a comprehensive assessment of an independent review into the tragic circumstances surrounding the death of Declan Hainey.

The role and involvement of social work and health services in the case has been considered and progress is reported on the implementation of a range of actions arising from the review.

This report sets out the findings of the first annual review undertaken by Action for Children and the University of Stirling with the aim of establishing a baseline of the current situation for neglected children across the UK.

Based on extensive research, consultation and original analysis, this report adds new dimensions to the case for early intervention.

It shines a light on the disproportionate vulnerability of babies to abuse and neglect; and it provides the first estimates of the numbers of babies affected by parental problems of substance misuse, mental illness and domestic abuse.

The tragic deaths of Victoria Climbié in 2000 and Peter Connelly in 2007 brought the difficulties of identifying and dealing with severe neglect and abuse sharply into public focus. These children died, following weeks and months of appalling abuse, at the hands of those responsible for caring for them.

The public outcries that followed asked how the many different professionals who had seen these children and their families in the weeks before their deaths could have failed to recognise the extent of the children’s maltreatment.