carers

Data from the Census in 2001 found that carers are a third more likely to be in poor health than non carers. The more recent Scottish Household Survey found that 12% of carers reported that they were in poor health. This increases to 18% for those caring for 20 hours or more each week. 12% of people termed in the Scottish Household Survey as “economically inactive” providing care also consider themselves to be permanent sick or disabled.

In 2012 Natural England commissioned Dementia Adventure (a Community Interest Company which connects people living with dementia, with nature and a sense of adventure) to review the existing evidence of the benefits and barriers facing people living with dementia in accessing the natural environment and their local green space.

No one would argue that unpaid family carers should not be equal partners in care, as their care constitutes over 50% of all care provided in every local authority and NHS region of Scotland. Consistent and meaningful carer engagement must therefore be at the heart of all good health and social care policy. But a great gulf remains between good intentions and good practice. The Coalition of Carers in Scotland is pleased to o!er the carer engagement standards in this document as a bridge to help planning o"cers and commissioners of services move from good intentions to better practice.

The Better Breaks programme awarded its first grants in March 2012. 51 grants, totalling £1,121,602 were distributed to projects across Scotland so that these projects could deliver quality short breaks for children and young people with disabilities which would be tailored to their needs whilst giving their families a break from caring.
The evaluation was based on information provided by the funded projects through their applications, their End of Grant reports, any supporting materials provided, selected telephone calls and review of the Shared Stories films.

Shared Care Scotland exists to promote the development of more imaginative, personcentred approaches to short breaks and respite care. The carers and service users we speak to are looking for quality services which offer choice, flexibility and reliability; a range of services that meet different needs and circumstances rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach. The development of Short Break Bureaux in Scotland, involves collaborative working between the statutory and voluntary sector. This guide provides a model of service planning.

This Statistics Release presents information on respite care services provided or purchased by Local Authorities in Scotland. Respite Care is a service intended to benefit a carer and the person he or she cares for by providing a short break from caring tasks

The Scottish Government and COSLA are determined to ensure that carers are supported to manage their caring responsibilities with confidence and in good health, and to have a life of their own outside of caring. This is a strategy developed by the Health Boards, national carer organisations and carers, which will build on the support already in place and take forward the recommendations of the landmark report, Care 21: the future of unpaid care in Scotland.

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed.

This Insight focuses on the long-term emotional and psychological needs of stroke survivors and their carers.