adult social care

Joint research project between the University of Stirling, East Dunbartonshire, Falkirk and Perth and Kinross Councils.

The research explores assessment and intervention under the statute, from the perspective of practitioners and the people who use services.

The purpose of this report is to review existing knowledge management and evidence-based practice activities and networks in the North West region and to develop a regional strategy for taking this forward. Time and resources are often wasted because people develop methods over and over again, rather than sharing what they know through reliable local, regional, national and international networks.

Paper that sets important issues relating to positive risk-taking in adult social care in a legal context; considers how current care provision impacts on the human rights of service users; and analyses the extent to which the present regulatory and commissioning frameworks stifle or encourage risk-taking in adult social care.

Paper that reviews the prevailing approaches and attitudes to risk-taking across the four nations of the UK; considers current and likely future regulatory responses regarding this, drawing out similarities and differences and implications for these; and highlights potential areas for shared learning.

Paper that argues that ‘risk’ is often perceived negatively by people using services (used as an excuse used for stopping them doing something) – but risk needs to be shared between the person taking the risk and the system that is trying to support them; states that although some people fear that personalisation may increase risk, it could help people to be safer by putting them more in control of their lives, helping them plan ahead, and focusing our safeguarding expertise on those who really need it; and considers the fact that in an era of personalisation, approaches to risk and regulat

Paper that explores the relationship between policy initiatives regarding risk-taking in adult care and its claim to reflect user experience; argues that these policy initiatives are driven by the imperative of rationalising risk management; and claims that such policies are not a response to user demand and that more research is needed to evaluate the attitudes of users of adult care to risk-taking.

Study that investigated the realities of making choices about services and support over time, by disabled people of working age and older, who were likely to experience repeated choices due to their changing circumstances.

Based on a review of the existing literature and IPC’s own experience in working with local authorities reviewing their safeguarding procedures, this discussion paper looks at the relationship between personalisation, safeguarding and commissioning.

Report on care and support in older people's services in the UK - what has caused the current crisis and possible solutions to the problems.

Briefing that examines the implications of the Equality Act 2010 for personalised adult social care. The Act provides a legal framework which can support personalisation in adult social care.

They are both about ensuring individuals receive services that are respectful, effective and accessible. It is essential that care providers from all sectors understand the implications for them.