Audio

The third programme in the series looks at the work of British psychologist Sir Frederic Bartlett who discovered that when he asked people to repeat an unfamiliar story they had read, they changed it to fit their existing knowledge, and that it was the revised story which they memorised.

Bartlett's findings led him to propose 'schema' - the cultural and historical contextualisation of memory, which has important implications for eyewitness testimony, false memory syndrome, and even for artificial intelligence. Claudia Hammond investigates the impact of Bartlett's findings.

This BBC radio programme looks at cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and questions whether vulnerable patients are losing out.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on single women in light of Jan MacVarish's latest paper, 'Understanding the Popularity of Living Alone', which contains the results of her 10 years' study of single women.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on electronic tagging. In the summer of 2005, the UK Home Secretary, David Blunkett, announced the expansion of tagging schemes for offenders which was predicted to lead to an increase in the number that are tagged and the introduction of satellite tagging.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at whether new legislation will address the problem of overcrowded family accommodation. A new Housing Bill is about to become law. One of the most significant changes it will make is a redefinition of overcrowding in family homes.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series discusses men and crying. Recent research found that British men are now more willing to admit to crying. Author, Mark Mason and psychiatrist, Jonathan Pimm talk to Jenni Murray about why it's increasingly acceptable for men to well up -and what they cry about.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at ways in which to help families who have been affected by the imprisonment of a family member. The charity, Action for Families, is co-ordinating 'family relationship workshops' in prisons. At Ashwell Prison near Leicester, wives and partners come together with male prisoners to spend a day thinking through some of the problems they may face. Caroline Swinburne joins Theresa Oldman of Relate.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on juvenile offending and looks at a new study which brings up to date the stories of fifty men first encountered as boys in an American reform school in the 1950s.

Laurie Taylor meets Professor John Laub to find out what the boys' subsequent biographies have to tell us about a widely accepted linkage between juvenile offending and long-term criminal careers. The segment is second in the audio clip after a segment on dirt and cleanliness.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on criminal policy transfer in view of criminals who increasingly operate across national boundaries and so apparently do ideas of criminal justice.

Laurie Taylor talks to criminologist, Professor Tim Newburn, and considers the claim that crime control policies here and in the United States are converging. The segment is second in the audio clip after a look at economies of design.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at the widening wealth gap under the Labour Government. More than half of families with disabled children live on the margins of poverty; just 16 percent of mothers with disabled children work, compared with 61 percent of other mothers; and childminders and nurseries geared to providing facilities for disabled children are scarce. With the Government setting targets to tackle child poverty,