Audio

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how the Yorkshire Ripper's crimes affected the 25 children he left motherless. Almost 30 years ago, a young woman went missing in the early hours of the morning. When they found her body, only yards away from the house where her four young children had been sleeping, the police were yet to realise they had a serial killer in their midst. Wilma McCann was the first victim of Peter Sutcliffe who became known as the Yorkshire Ripper.

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity, presented by Connie St Louis. These four programmes explore the adult years of 20-40.

The first programme looks at how the fully formed body functions, the second discusses sex and relationships, the third examines mental health in early adulthood, and the final programme discusses lifestyle and keeping active.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at how appropriate a western notion of secularism is in dealing with the complexities of a multi-faith society. Laurie Taylor is joined by Rajeev Bhargava, Professor of Political Science at the University of Delhi and Anshuman Mondal, Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary Literature at the University of Leicester, to debate whether western secularism has outlived its purpose and if anything can be learnt from the Indian model of secularism.

Professor Fergus McNeil of Glasgow University examines the challenges facing the criminal justice system.

The Reith Lectures were inaugurated in 1948 by the BBC to mark the historic contribution made to public service broadcasting by Sir John (later Lord) Reith, the corporation's first director-general. Each year, the BBC invites a leading figure to deliver a series of lectures on radio.

The 2001 Reith Lectures are on 'The End of Age' and contain 5 lectures by Tom Kirkwood, Professor of Medicine and head of the Department of Gerontology at the University of Newcastle.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the history of the housewife. Laurie Taylor talks to Dr Justine Lloyd, Visiting Fellow in the School of Sociology at the University of Lancaster and co-author of 'Sentenced to Everyday Life - Feminism and the Housewife' which examines the history of the housewife in the 1940's and 1950's, and asks whether she was really more of a feminist than we might think. The segment is second in the audio clip after a discussion on cricket.

Section of the BBC Radio 4 website containing podcasts on matters relating to disability such as the latest news on legislation, public policy and social trends and how they affect people with disabilities. Also features investigations into products and medical advances intended to improve life with a disability.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how a group of Yorkshire women were determined to save a tradition. For generations the women of Skipton have pegged out their washing on lines strung across the back alley that separates Thornton Street from Clitheroe Street. But when a man complained that this practice prevented him parking his car behind his house, it looked as though this tradition might come to an end. Margaret Hicks has lived in the street all her life and was determined to galvanise a group of women into fighting back.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. In the first Laurie Taylor speaks to Dr Laura Piacentini about her new research on imprisonment in Russia which took her to prison colonies where she lived, shared vodka with the prison officers and listened to recitations of Alexander Pushkin's poetry. There, she discovered that contrary to expectations, the Russian penal system allowed prisoners certain freedoms denied them in British jails.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at research published in 1960 on social change and kinship patterns in Swansea which showed how extended family networks operate. Forty years on, a group of social scientists decided to replicate the 1960 survey and track the changes that have taken place in that time.

Host, Laurie Taylor, is joined by Professor Nickie Charles, one of the co- authors of the new survey to talk about the ways in which family networks persist despite the instability of 21st century life.