Adobe Acrobat PDF

An Act of the Scottish Parliament to amend the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 in various respects; to make provision about mental health disposals in criminal cases; to make provision as to the rights of victims of crime committed by mentally-disordered persons; and for connected purposes.

Report that assessed the progress three years into the 10-year Scottish Government and Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) programme, Reshaping care for older people (RCOP). It is aimed at improving services for older people by shifting care towards anticipatory care and prevention.

Mentoring and befriending schemes can help spark a positive change in the lives of society’s looked-after children. This report reviews the place of these schemes and makes a case for making this type of relationship more accessible.

A detailed outline of the theory of change, the indicators used and a summary of the evidence for the Practitioner Research and Older People research project.

This report describes the results of a year-long evaluation of the Community Visitor pilot, conducted by researchers at the University of Essex. It was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF), and forms part of a wider programme of work by JRF in the field of risk and relationship in the care sector.

First in a series of briefings from CELCIS that help to explain specific parts of the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014. Each briefing will set out clearly the new rights and responsibilities of looked after children, care leavers and carers, and the new duties, powers and expectations placed on public bodies.

Briefing that highlights some of the key enablers and barriers to integration and provides information on integrated approaches to health and social care in the UK, Europe and further afield.

Briefing that gives an overview of mental health in Scotland. It first discusses mental health within a global and European context, before focussing in more detail on the picture in Scotland. 

It reviews what is currently known regarding the prevalence of mental health conditions, the organisation of mental health services, the current legislative and policy framework that underpins mental health service provision, how these services are regulated and monitored, and finally, the costs and funding of mental health services.

The Time to Live strand is part of the Creative Breaks programme and awards grants directly to individual carers so that they can arrange and pay for the short break that suits them best. In 2011 the Time to Live strand was piloted with 12 organisations who offer support to carers based upon geographical boundaries. In 2012 the application was extended to include organisations with a national, condition specific focus. This evaluation examines the projects running from October 2012 through to September 2013.