Adobe Acrobat PDF

Document that is the second review of research evidence completed for ADSW by Professor Alison Petch from IRISS on the factors that underpin best health and social care integrated practice.

The original document, An evidence base for the delivery of adult services, published in 2011, presented the evidence for considering factors beyond those of structural change when planning to improve integrated outcomes for individuals. This latest report further adds to the knowledge base by focusing on the key dimensions for effective implementation of change.

Social enterprise, characterised by organisations enacting a hybrid mix of non-profit and for-profit characteristics, is increasingly regarded as an important component in the regeneration of areas affected by social and economic deprivation. In parallel there has been growing academic, practitioner and policy interest in 'social value' and 'social impact' within the broader 'social economy'.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring adults’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 13,000 face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

This statistics release presents information on respite care services provided or purchased by local authorities in Scotland. Respite care is a service intended to benefit a carer and the person he or she cares for by providing a short break from caring tasks.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) lets you see at a glance what’s new on your favourite websites. The websites feed information out to you and you choose whether to read or not. This saves time.

You can use RSS to keep track of whole websites, parts of websites, blogs or podcasts.

When you see a feed that looks interesting you subscribe to it by clicking on the icon (subscribe simply means add to my list - it doesn’t mean you have to pay).

First you need a feed reader. There are many to choose from and most are free, but there are three methods to chose from.

Report that considers how well implementation of the recommendations of the review has progressed in the year since the review’s publication, and how the child protection landscape as a whole is changing. The overall conclusion of the report is that progress is moving in the right direction but that it needs to move faster. There are promising signs that some reforms are encouraging new ways of thinking and working and so improving services for children.

The ‘Sight and Sound Project’ used creative sensory methods to explore how young people who are looked after feel that they belong, or do not belong, in the places that they live.

Paper that examines whether there are any changes the Scottish Government can make, in the short-term, to improve the way the government-funded nursery provision works as well as feed into the wider debate on childcare.

Guidance that is supplementary to, and should be read in conjunction with the Scottish Government 'National guidance for child protection in Scotland 2010'. The guidance outlines key definitions and concepts, specifically a definition of what constitutes child abuse and neglect and harm/significant harm.

Guidance that aims to support and assist practitioners at all levels in every agency, to be able to approach the task of risk identification, assessment, analysis and management with more confidence and competence.

It seeks to provide tools that, if used, support methodical and systematic approaches to not only better understanding risk and its presentation with children and families, but also enhance interventions and potential outcomes.