Adobe Acrobat PDF

Understanding and measuring outcomes: the role of qualitative data

Guide that has been developed to support the collection and use of personal outcomes data. Personal outcomes data refers to information gathered from people supported by health and social services and their unpaid carers about what's important to them in their lives and the ways in which they would like to be supported. The guide is divided into three parts.

Part 1 explores the links between an outcomes approach and qualitative data, why qualitative data is important and what it can achieve.

Rethinking Respite for People Affected by Dementia

The ‘Dementia: More Than Just Memory Loss’ report, was published in 2016, and set out some of the key issues affecting people with dementia in Wales, in particular:
• A widespread lack of knowledge and understanding of dementia amongst professionals and the wider public.
• A lack of flexibility to effectively meet the needs of people living with dementia
and their carers.
• A lack of co-operation between services creates unnecessary difficulties and
barriers for people living with dementia and their carers.

The Outdoors - A Natural Place for Young People with Autism, End of Project Report

This End of Project Report describes an innovative Transition to Work Programme for young people with autistic spectrum diagnoses and is the result of a pilot programme developed by Lothian Autistic Society (LAS) and Scottish Outdoor Education Centres (SOEC) and made possible through funding from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). The pilot had the twin aims of developing employability skills and exploring the therapeutic value of the outdoors. 

Short break support is failing family carers: reviewing progress 10 years on from Mencap’s first Breaking Point report

In 2006 Mencap produced a comprehensive review of short break provision. Now, 10 years on, they are revisiting the support available for family carers to see whether recent policy initiatives and investment have delivered the much-needed change. A total of 264 family carers responded to their survey on short breaks provision and experiences of caring. They also sent Freedom of Information requests to all 152 local authorities in England that provide social care services.

A review of respite / short break provision for adult carers of adults in the Highland Partnership area

As part of the implementation of the Equal Partners in Care (EPiC) Highland Carer’s Strategy 2014-2017 it was agreed to undertake a review of respite for Adult Carers of Adults (aged 16+). Independent consultants were commissioned by NHS Highland through Connecting Carers to undertake this work.
There are four groups of people – totalling an estimated 200 people - with whom conversations have taken place during the review:
Carers and staff from carer support organisations – more than 75 carers have given their views;

Harnessing knowledge for innovative and cost-effective practice: the role of the intermediary

Explores how the Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS) promotes the delivery of cost effective social services in Scotland that will support the achievement of positive outcomes for people accessing support. It identifies a number of principles that underpin the work of IRISS and suggests how these facilitate innovative evidence-informed practice. The approach to evidence-informed practice comprises four pillars of activity.

What helps women who have learning disabilities get checked for cervical cancer?

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Elaine Monteith from ENABLE Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme.

Evaluation of sixteen women's community justice services in Scotland

In 2013-15, the Scottish Government funded 16 projects proposed by criminal justice partners across Scotland to develop community services for women who offend. Developments were based on existing service provision and to ensure changes could be sustained locally at the end of the funding. Funding varied in amount and timeframes. Most of the projects were undertaken by local authority criminal justice social work1 (CJSW) departments with partner providers, including public and third sector agencies.