SSKS

This is a short introduction to using information and communication technology (ICT) in activities for people with dementia. It is aimed at managers and staff in the care sector, and those who organise activities for people with dementia. It's a plain language guide about using mainstream technologies - you don't need to be technically minded.

A new report from JRF outlines the findings from the My Home Life project. My Home Life is a collaborative initiative between Age UK, City University, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Dementia UK promoting quality of life in care homes. Report published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in October 2012.

A growing number of people with dementia in the UK are becoming actively involved in groups to try to influence services and policies affecting people with dementia. The Dementia Engagement & Empowerment Project (DEEP) was a one-year investigation aiming to highlight groups and projects involving people with dementia. The report offers specific ways forward for organisations wishing to engage with people with dementia. Resource published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in October 2012. Summary and full report available.

This page contains the findings of systematic reviews undertaken within the EPPI-Centre for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. The 'Case' Drivers, Impacts and Value work is the largest single piece of policy research published for culture and sport. Comprising three different strands it is the most comprehensive piece of work in this field, assessing a huge range of research and data, setting the foundations for evidence-based policy making. Evidence Summary published by the EPPI-Centre in October 2012.

Concerns over the health implications of poor diets, and claims for links between cooking and social connectedness, have led to heightened interest in the UK public’s ability to cook. There has been a focus recently on community-based, ‘home cooking’ courses aimed at adults. This review aimed to explore the range of these courses evaluated in the UK; and to synthesise findings about outcomes and appropriateness. Evidence summary published by the EPPI-Centre in 2012.

The way that public services are organised and work has changed considerably over the last 25 years. One of the main changes has been to divide the function of public agencies into service purchasers which ‘commission’ or ‘purchase’ services on behalf of the public and service providers which provide the services. This change has been introduced across all public sectors in many different countries. The broad aim of this research was to identify research evidence on ‘commissioning’ or ‘public service purchasing’ in education, health and/or social welfare in the UK and other countries.

This research briefing provides an overview of the evidence concerning the value of supervision in supporting the practice of social care and social work. It is relevant to both children’s and adult social care services and includes a consideration of supervision in integrated, multi-professional teams. While the focus is on social work and social care, some of the research reviewed includes participants from other professions such as nursing and psychology.

This At a glance briefing gives a summary of a review of literature and a small-scale survey of good practice on the participation and co-production of older people with high support needs. The report brings together the most recent and relevant research findings and development initiatives and identifies barriers to the participation of older people with high support needs and some solutions. It also identifies effective practice initiatives for increasing the participation of older people with high support needs, as well as new approaches to involve older people with high support needs.

This is a summary of research literature on the participation and co-production of older people with high support needs. Benefits and barriers are identified and practice examples are listed. The report will be of particular interest to commissioners of social and health care services. It will also be useful for people working in housing provision and service users and others developing the co-production/participation agenda in care provision and service development. Resource published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in October 2012. Review date in October 2015.

This report considers how York can become a more dementia-friendly city. While York is responding positively in many ways to the needs of people with dementia, there is still much to do to make sure that people can live well with dementia.