SSKS

This interim guide aims to help managers, commissioners, providers and practitioners in all sectors of adult social care to:

* acknowledge and understand the occurrence, risks and effects of age discrimination
* identify key features of an age-equalities approach to social care
* recognise some of the obstacles to achieving age equality and reducing age discrimination
* share information, develop ideas, and implement changes to overcome the obstacles.

The MCA Code of Practice says that the IMCA safeguard is intended for ‘those people who have little or no network of support, such as close family or friends, who take an interest in their welfare or no one willing or able to be formally consulted in decision-making processes’ (10.74). It provides guidance about when an IMCA should be instructed in cases where a person has some contact with family or friends

E-learning programme that sets out to help frontline social workers gain a basic understanding of the principles and practice of knowledge management, as well as organise and manage their knowledge and information as effectively as possible.

This resource invites people to explore different dimensions of interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration (IPIAC) and to hear, early on, from those who use care services and carers speaking about their experiences of effective and ineffective collaboration. It will help develop and review understanding of: what is meant by ‘interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration’ (IPIAC); why collaboration has grown in importance; the kinds of evidence that informs collaboration; and key policy and legislation and their timeline.

Resource that details what Fair Access to Care Services (FACS) is, what's new, what's changed and what's remained the same, as well as how FACS will apply to practice.

Review commissioned by SCIE to identify and consolidate the available evidence of progress and innovation in advocacy practice in relation to people with learning disabilities and high support needs.

This briefing focuses on other therapies or measures to help children and young people who deliberately self-harm (DSH). The aim of the therapy is either to reduce the amount they self harm or to stop them self-harming completely. The population covered by this briefing are children and adolescents up to the age of 19 who live in the community. The characteristics of self-harm, and the psychological and psychosocial factors associated with self-harm among children and adolescents are covered in a previous briefing in this series.

The children’s residential care sector across the UK has changed markedly over the past two decades and more. One impact of these changes has been a greatly reduced residential sector, with the proportion of looked-after children who are placed in residential care declining over this period.

This research briefing considers the refocusing of children’s services in England and Wales towards prevention and early identification of children in need of protection and support.