Shared Care Scotland

The Scottish Government recently released the 2012 data for the provision of respite in Local Authority areas across Scotland. The statistics are presented in "respite weeks provided or purchased by local authorities" and then further broken down into "overnight" and "daytime" respite for three age groups: 0-17, 18-64 and 65+. Much of the data is only comparable on a year-to-year basis due to methodological changes that have taken place over time. However a number of helpful comparisons are possible.

This report presents the findings of research carried out by ENABLE Scotland between April 2011 and April 2012 with the aim of improving knowledge and understanding of emergency planning for carers in Scotland, particularly within the wider context of Carer’s Assessments.

The report has two main objectives:

1. To establish the provision of support to carers with emergency planning across all local authority areas, highlighting examples of good practice and producing recommendations based on the findings.

2. To explore the role of sibling carers.

This literature review focuses on the current provision of respite care / disabled Holidays in the UK. It particularly focuses on the views of the Government and disabled advocacy groups regarding the provision and funding of respite, and the effects of the recent government spending review upon these services. Literature was also studied relating to the views of respite care held by disabled people and their carers.

This report describes the findings of research carried out between August and December 2011 into the experiences of unpaid carers in accessing and using short breaks (respite care). The study explored, from the carers’ perspective the benefits of short breaks (provided by formal services and family and friends), good practice in planning and provision, deficits and areas for improvement. Research findings are based on 1210 responses to a Scotland-wide survey distributed through carer organisations, four focus groups involving 36 carers and 13 interviews.

This is one in a series of research briefings about preventive care and support for adults.
Prevention is broadly defined to include a wide range of services that:
• promote independence
• prevent or delay the deterioration of wellbeing resulting from ageing, illness or disability
• delay the need for more costly and intensive services.

The main purpose of this report is to inform the work of Scotland‟s Commissioner for Children and Young People over the next four years, specifically in relation to disabled children and young people whom he has already identified as a priority group.
The aims are:
1. To identify and review the major social research studies about disabled children and young people in Scotland published since devolution (1999), looking at issues which can be a barrier to their inclusion in society.

This is Evaluation Support Scotland's presentation on how to evaluate your short breaks project. It was aimed at managers of projects funded by the Short Breaks Fund but useful to any third sector project that wants to develop their evaluations skills and share their learning.

The Short Breaks Fund was launched in November 2010 and has been made available through funding from the Scottish Government in recognition of the important contribution which carers make in caring for a loved one, and the vital role breaks play in sustaining carers and those they care for.

With a foreword by Minister for Public Health Michael Matheson this report considers what projects from the first round of funding have achieved, and captures their challenges and from this to considers what learning can be taken forward into future funding allocations.

Shared Care Scotland exists to promote the development of more imaginative, personcentred approaches to short breaks and respite care. The carers and service users we speak to are looking for quality services which offer choice, flexibility and reliability; a range of services that meet different needs and circumstances rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach. The development of Short Break Bureaux in Scotland, involves collaborative working between the statutory and voluntary sector. This guide provides a model of service planning.

The paper looks at the importance of communication in building positive relationships between people who use short break services and their carers, and the people providing the service.