Scottish Recovery Network

This booklet of short narratives of recovery has been derived from the research project: "Recovering Mental Health in Scotland. Research project" (Brown, Wendy, and Kandirikirira, Niki. 2007). The stories are summaries from research interviews conducted with individuals who are in recovery from long term metal health problems. (en)

This short booklet has been derived from the research report: "Recovering Mental Health in Scotland. Report on Narrative Investigation of Mental Health Recovery" (Brown, Wendy, and Kandirikirira, Niki. 2007).

It is intended to highlight some of the strategies that people indicated had supported their mental health recovery journey.

This is the fourth in a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. This discussion paper provides an overview of some of the findings of longitudinal mental health outcome studies that have been conducted in the course of the few last decades in different countries and with different patient groups.

This discussion paper from the Scottish Recovery Network concentrates on a developing model of peer support where peer workers are employed and trained as peer workers specifically because of their own lived experience of recovery.

The NES/SRN Mental Health Recovery Project is a joint project between NHS Education for Scotland and the Scottish Recovery Network. The project is part of the overall implementation of the actions contained in 'Rights, Relationships and Recovery' (Scottish Executive, 2006), the national review of mental health nursing in Scotland. The overall aim of the project is to provide an outline framework for training/education for mental health nurses in relation to recovery and identify next actions for the implementation of this framework.

These materials have been designed to support mental health workers to develop their recovery focused practice. They build on 'The 10 Essential Shared Capabilities (Scotland)' learning materials and are designed to provide further learning to enable mental health workers to work alongside service users as they create their own unique recovery journeys.

The Scottish Recovery Network commissioned the Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health to undertake a scoping exercise on the Development of Peer Specialist Roles in Scotland. This paper reports on two aspects of the project: 1. A literature scoping exercise on existing models of accredited training and peer specialist roles; 2. Telephone interviews with existing peer specialist / peer support projects in Scotland, and the US.

This Framework has been developed as one of the actions identified in Rights, Relationships and Recovery: the report of the national review of mental health nursing in Scotland (SEHD 2006). The Framework outlines the knowledge, skills and values mental health nurses require to work in a recovery focused way with people who use mental health services and their friends, family and carers. This Framework should be seen as part of a process in supporting the development of rights, values and recovery focused practice.

This is one of a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. Traditional approaches to supporting people with significant mental health problems have tended to make little use of people's connections with their local communities. Yet communities have strengths and attributes which are an important part of recovery which this paper considers.

This is one of a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. It discusses some of the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research and argues that qualitative methods are suitable for the generation of rich, narrative accounts of lived experiences that may aid the identification of factors promoting recovery.